Health & Fitness

Health & Fitness

Studyng the perpetual munchies

As Murphy (the narc) says in “Cheech and Chong’s Up in Smoke” (1978): “Ingestion of marijuana from smoking invariably produces not only severe hunger pains, but ... [a] portentous appetite ... manifesting itself in a total uncontrollable frenzy of eating quite a lot.”

Health & Fitness

Kids’ new insomnia habit: waking up to text

“Story Time” is a texting game in which participants feed one another followup lines to an emerging story. “Quotes” is another time-killer that has caught on: One player texts an iconic quote from a book or movie, and the other player tries to ID it. Sounds harmless enough, right? But when kids do it at 3 a.m. or sign on to Facebook and other social media sites at that hour, they’re risking more than lost sleep.

Health & Fitness

The Mediterranean diet and your brain

The word “Mediterranean” is Latin for “middle of the Earth.” The ancient Romans gave the sea this name because it was the center of the Earth as they knew it. We know the sea is not the center of the world, but there are ever more reasons for you to make the dietary habits of the region the center of your diet. You’ve probably heard that the so-called Mediterranean diet helps protect your heart and reduces your risk for cancer, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Well, now research shows that sticking to this diet can protect your brain as well.

Health & Fitness

Safety tips to avoid burns during winter

During cold-weather months, we tend to see specific preventable burn injuries as a result of people trying to stay warm. Fire is a major winter hazard that is often avoidable. For example, according to the National Fire Protection Association, space heaters cause 40 percent of home heating fires as well as 84 percent of home heating fire deaths.

Health & Fitness

Take a Facebook break

In the movie “The Social Network,” a fictional depiction of the founding of Facebook, tech entrepreneur Sean Parker, played by Justin Timberlake, remarks, “We lived on farms, we lived in cities, and now we’re going to live on the internet!”

Health & Fitness

Taking carbon monoxide seriously

Mark Scott, an emergency medicine physician at the University of Kansas Hospital, explains how hyperbolic chambers help relieve headaches, nausea and other symptoms associated with carbon monoxide poisoning. Odorless and colorless, the gas kills 400 to 500 people in the U.S. each year and sickens thousands of others.

Videos

Taking carbon monoxide seriously

Mark Scott, an emergency medicine physician at the University of Kansas Hospital, explains how hyperbolic chambers help relieve headaches, nausea and other symptoms associated with carbon monoxide poisoning. Odorless and colorless, the gas kills 400 to 500 people in the U.S. each year and sickens thousands of others.
Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star
Taking carbon monoxide seriously 1:57

Taking carbon monoxide seriously

What is the state of America's health in 2016? 1:53

What is the state of America's health in 2016?

How holiday music may help your health 1:01

How holiday music may help your health

5-year-old cancer patient's climb up the stairs inspires 0:27

5-year-old cancer patient's climb up the stairs inspires

Entertainment Videos