Lan Le (left) and Jordan Sasser (right) work on a plane at Yingling Aviation on Tuesday afternoon. The aviation industry is wrestling with a tightening supply of aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians that's expected to turn into a shortage by 2022, less than four years from now. (March 28, 2018)
Lan Le (left) and Jordan Sasser (right) work on a plane at Yingling Aviation on Tuesday afternoon. The aviation industry is wrestling with a tightening supply of aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians that's expected to turn into a shortage by 2022, less than four years from now. (March 28, 2018) Bo Rader The Wichita Eagle
Lan Le (left) and Jordan Sasser (right) work on a plane at Yingling Aviation on Tuesday afternoon. The aviation industry is wrestling with a tightening supply of aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians that's expected to turn into a shortage by 2022, less than four years from now. (March 28, 2018) Bo Rader The Wichita Eagle

If things don't change, there may not be enough of them to keep planes flying

March 28, 2018 05:13 PM