State Colleges

Neosho County’s Brylie Ware wins NJCAA Triple Crown, but talk of future can wait

Neosho County freshman third baseman Brylie Ware listens to Neosho coach Steve Murry in the dugout. Ware, a Sedgwick native, is the first NJCAA Triple Crown winner since 1985.
Neosho County freshman third baseman Brylie Ware listens to Neosho coach Steve Murry in the dugout. Ware, a Sedgwick native, is the first NJCAA Triple Crown winner since 1985. Courtesy photo

Brylie Ware first got the news from Neosho County baseball coach Steve Murry.

He can’t remember exactly where or when it happened, but he does know for sure it was Murry who told the freshman third baseman from Sedgwick that the NJCAA Triple Crown was his after leading the nation in batting average, home runs and RBIs.

“To be honest, I’m not a big stats guy,” Ware said. “I didn’t really know it was a thing until late in the season, and Murry came up to me and told me I’d won it and that it had never really been done.

“To be put in the positions I’ve been in, with these teammates and these coaches, makes it an honor. They put me in some really great spots with getting on base and giving me those opportunities.”

I don’t think the pressure gets to (Ware) because he puts so much pressure on himself. Whatever outside pressures there are don’t add up to that.

Neosho baseball coach Steve Murry

Ware is the first player to win the Triple Crown since Trinidad (Colo.) State’s Scott Jaster in 1985. He has helped lead No. 5 Neosho (49-9) to a Jayhawk East title and the No. 1 seed in the Region VI playoffs, where they face Allen on Friday at Lawrence-Dumont Stadium.

He finished the regular season with a .589 batting average, 122 RBIs and 29 home runs – just one home run ahead of Hutchinson’s Caden Doga.

“It’s just so rare … the chances of doing it with both batting average and RBIs are slim, but you can see it happening for somebody,” Murry said. “But to add home runs in there, too, takes a lot besides just being a great player.

“Honestly, it’s the same kid he was before all of this. I don’t think the pressure gets to him because he puts so much pressure on himself. Whatever outside pressures there are don’t add up to that.”

.589 batting average

29 home runs

122 RBIs

Ware’s biggest decisions in the coming weeks and months will happen off the field. He’s gone from one Division I offer out of high school – a late pitch from Kansas State – to having his pick of schools.

He’s taken visits, so far, to Oklahoma and Arkansas, who both have offered. K-State’s offer is still on the table. TCU, Nebraska and Wichita State all want him to take visits after the season.

“We field probably five calls per day from big Division I schools and pro scouts asking about him,” Murry said. “What he does is completely up to him, but I don’t think he’s going to make that decision until after our season is over.”

Murry and Ware handle the colleges who come calling. Inquiries from pro scouts are directed to Ware’s father, Pat.

“I think we’ve had around 10 to 15 MLB teams that have sent questionnaires and medical forms to find out about his medical background,” Pat Ware said. “The scouts like his batting, and they think he has the skills to hit at the AA or AAA levels pretty quickly and they can work on his footwork and making him a stronger fielder.

“After the season he can sit down and do all the pros and cons with his mother and I, but ultimately it’s up to him.”

Tony Adame: 316-268-6284, @t_adame

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