Crime & Courts

Former Wichita used car salesman ordered to pay restitution in business fraud case

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Charles Ponzi didn’t invent his eponymous pyramid scheme — but he lent star power to one of the oldest scams in the book. He also believed that his plan could have become a legitimate business.

A former used car salesman at a Wichita dealership has been ordered to pay over $15,000 in restitution in a business fraud case.

Obada Alashqar, 24, of Wichita, was ordered to pay the restitution to NextGear Capital after he was found guilty of conspiracy to impair a security interest, District Attorney Marc Bennett said in a news release. Alashqar and his brother, Abdallah Alashqar, were operators of the now-defunct Adams Auto Sales and Repairs car lot at 220 E. Kellogg.

A Sedgwick County District Court judge ordered Obada Alashqar to pay the restitution after he was accused of conspiring with his business partner to defraud NextGear Capital, their finance company, Bennett said. The company provided the dealership with a line of credit to purchase used cars for resale. Alashqar was required to pay back the financing to NextGear after cars were sold, but he allegedly kept the money, according to the news release.

If Alashqar violates his probation in the case by failing to make monthly restitution payments, he would have to serve five months in prison, the release said.

The brothers were previously ordered to pay over half a million dollars in a civil judgment after they ignored a lawsuit by the District Attorney’s Office consumer protection division. Prosecutors had alleged 48 violations by the brothers and their car lot, including failure to disclose safety recalls, failure to provide car titles, taking customer trade-in vehicles without paying for them, selling vehicles “as is” and not having an auto dealer license with the Kansas Department of Revenue. The brothers failed to appear in court on that case.

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