Crime & Courts

The Wichita Eagle’s complete coverage of the deadly swatting incident

On Dec. 29, 2017, Wichita police went to 1033 W. McCormick expecting to find a homicide victim and two hostages. Instead, Andrew Finch, 28, opened his front door when he saw police lights outside and didn’t know why. Wichita police say he was given commands to keep his hands raised, but he reached toward his waistline multiple times.

When he reached his hands up suddenly, police say a officer who was standing in a driveway across the street from Finch shot him.

Wichita police went to the address because of a call to 911 that turned out to be "swatting." Swatting happens when someone makes a call to a police department with a false story of an ongoing crime – often with killing or hostages involved – in an attempt to draw a large number of police officers to a particular address.

It was the first time a swatting call turned deadly.

Here is The Wichita Eagle and Kansas.com’s coverage of the incident.

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Lisa Finch, surrounded by family members, reacts to the killing of her son, Andrew Finch, who was shot Thursday evening by police. The shooting may have been related to what online gamers have said in multiple Twitter posts as a “swatting” hoax i

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Around 400 swatting cases happen each year and the consequences can be deadly.

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In this video from the YouTube channel DramaAlert, a man who claims responsibility for a fake call to Wichita police answers questions about that call. The 911 call led to the death of Andrew Finch, 28. (Video courtesy of DramaAlert)

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Warning Graphic Content: Wichita Police Department releases the body camera video of officer-involved shooting. Police say the man shot was a victim of swatting. (Video by Wichita Police Department)

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A 911 caller told police he was holding his mother and little brother hostage in a house in the 1000 block of McCormick. Listen to the 911 call that led to the deadly "swatting" in Wichita. (Video by Candi Bolden)

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This video, provided by Nicole Davis, was taken from across the street from where Andrew Finch was shot and killed by Wichita police responding to a fake call at the address. Davis began shooting the video from her iPhone approximately one to two

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Wichita police converged on a house at 1033 W. McCormick on Dec. 28, responding to fake 911 call. Here’s a breakdown of how the call and police actions occurred.

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An activist is asked to leave after interrupting a speaker during a debate on police shootings in Wichita. (Feb. 13, 2018)

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Sedgwick County District Attorney Marc Bennett said that the Wichita police officer who shot Andrew Finch during a swatting incident in late December will not be charged.

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Wichita City Council turned off Lisa Finch's microphone after she went over 15 minutes during her address to the council. The city council allows each speaker 5 minutes. Finch is the mother of Andrew Finch, who was fatally shot by police Dec. 28.

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Wichita police Officer Justin Rapp testifies Tuesday about firing the fatal shot. Rapp was testifying in the preliminary hearing for Tyler Barriss, who is charged in the death of Andrew Finch after he made a "swatting" call.

Los Angeles police Detective Edward Dorroh describes his contacts with Tyler Barriss. If Andrew Finch hadn’t been killed by a Wichita police officer the day before, Barriss would have kept making the calls, Dorroh testified that Barriss told him.

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