Carrie Rengers

Brad Pistotnik Law expanding with two offices

Lawyer Brad Pistotnik stands in the space adjacent to his law firm at the Offices at Cranbrook where he’s expanding. Pistotnik also is adding a Garden City office.
Lawyer Brad Pistotnik stands in the space adjacent to his law firm at the Offices at Cranbrook where he’s expanding. Pistotnik also is adding a Garden City office. The Wichita Eagle

Brad Pistotnik is expanding his law firm in a couple of different ways.

Pistotnik started Brad Pistotnik Law in 2014 after his split from his brother and their Affiliated Attorneys of Pistotnik Law Offices.

After a brief stay in temporary space, Pistotnik moved his firm to about 2,000 square feet at Occidental Management’s Offices at Cranbrook at 10111 E. 21st St.

Then he moved within the development to about 3,400 square feet and got a basement along with the new space.

Now, he’s adding 1,400 square feet next to that for a new conference room, four more offices, some secretarial stations and “a big, big work area.”

“If we put one more hole in the wall, we’d be back to where we started,” Pistotnik says.

The firm has 17 employees and is adding more.

“We’ve been extremely busy,” Pistotnik says.

He says the firm is growing by 30 percent a year.

“The growth pattern has been faster than we thought.”

Like competitor DeVaughn James Injury Lawyers, Pistotnik is adding something of a west-side office – way west.

“We’re building one in Garden City,” Pistotnik says.

He’s building a 7,200-square-foot retail center, 1,500 square feet of which his firm will take along with a basement.

“I was basically doing it because I was trying to offset the cost of the building,” Pistotnik says of starting a whole center. “It’s not cheap out there.”

He says with an entire center, that means he’ll have room to grow, too.

Pistotnik has always advertised his firm quite a bit, but his most recent television commercials have been getting some attention because of who appears with him.

“That’s me and my bull, Domingo,” Pistotnik says.

Domingo isn’t actually his bull. Pistotnik rents him, but the two have a special relationship.

“The trainer told me I’m the only person he allows to ride him.”

Pistotnik says Domingo clearly remembered him over six days of shooting.

“They’re bright,” he says of bulls.

Some people assumed special effects were used to make it look like Pistotnik was riding. He did, though, actually get on the 2,500-pound bull, who can jump 6-foot high fences and has about a 10-mile-an-hour trot.

“It’s just when he starts running that I have to worry about it,” Pistotnik says.

Which did happen, he says.

“And I was worried.”

Sometimes Domingo lies down with Pistotnik still on top of him.

“I just figured out how to flip my feet out of the stirrups and jump,” Pistotnik says.

Why a bull at all?

“My mother used to call me a bull in a china closet,” Pistotnik says. “I’m not the best-coordinated person in the world.”

He does, though, know how to win over Domingo.

“You’ve got to pet him and feed him treats,” Pistotnik says. “He’s actually a pretty cool animal.”

Carrie Rengers: 316-268-6340, @CarrieRengers

  Comments