University of Kansas

No. 13 Utah will provide another tough test for Kansas

Utah forward Jakob Poeltl is averaging 11.3 points, 9.3 rebounds and 2.9 blocks per game.
Utah forward Jakob Poeltl is averaging 11.3 points, 9.3 rebounds and 2.9 blocks per game. The Associated Press

When the Kansas Jayhawks dressed for their first official basketball practice in early October, it’s fair to say that Bill Self had never heard the name Jakob Poeltl, which perhaps says something about college basketball’s ability to consistently surprise us.

Poeltl, a 7-foot freshman center at Utah, hails from Vienna, Austria — a place more known for its lederhosen than shot-blocking — is one of the biggest reasons the Utes are ranked 13th in the country as they arrive in Kansas City to face No. 10 Kansas at 2:15 p.m. Saturday in the Jayhawks’ annual game at the Sprint Center.

“I haven’t heard of a lot of great players coming from Vienna, Austria,” Self said on Friday. “I’ve actually visited there. It’s the most beautiful place I’ve ever been, but I didn’t know there were a lot of great players coming from there. This cat is really good.”

Poeltl, who is averaging 11.3 points, 9.3 rebounds and 2.9 blocks, is one of the college game’s breakout performers, which also might be a suitable tag for the Utah program as a whole.

Under the guidance of fourth-year coach Larry Krystkowiak, the Utes are 7-1 with an overtime victory over then-No. 8 Wichita State and a road victory at rival BYU. When Kansas scheduled Utah to be their Sprint Center opponent, KU officials understood that the Utes might be a top-25 team led by NBA prospect Delon Wright. But it’s perhaps fair to say that nobody expected this.

“I watched Utah play, and they reminded me so much of our Tulsa team,” said Self, who led the Golden Hurricane to the Elite Eight in 1999. “You got guys that can play at all spots; they can all pass, catch, shoot, think, slide — all those things and you have a guy (Poeltl) that can anchor it.”

For Kansas, the trip to Kansas City concludes a grueling non-conference stretch that began with a trip to the Orlando Classic and featured games against Michigan State, Florida, Georgetown and Utah — all teams currently ranked in the top 25 of KenPom.com’s computer rankings.

As final exams loom, the Jayhawks will receive a six-day break after Saturday. So Self is using the Utah game as an artificial end point for the first part of the non-conference slate. The Jayhawks will have four non-conference game remaining, beginning against Lafayette on Dec. 20, but the schedule should soften considerably after this weekend.

“We can catch our breath before finals week,” Self said.

If the Jayhawks (7-1) can survive Utah and win their seventh straight, they should have a respectable chance to finish the non-conference season with just one loss — an idea that seemed unlikely following a 72-40 loss to No. 1 Kentucky in the season’s second game.

“We’ve become more of a team,” Self said, “but we’ve learned how to win when we’re not playing great offensively.”

Even now, Kansas’ players will point to the Kentucky loss as an pivotal wake-up call. In the days after the humbling loss, the team met and talked about what it would take to come together as a team.

“It was some heart-to-heart stuff,” sophomore guard Wayne Selden said. “And we really buckled down.”

Last year, with three freshmen in the starting lineup, the Jayhawks suffered four losses during the non-conference season, losing three of those games in the final minutes. The Jayhawks had last-second losses to Villanova and Colorado, setting the tone for the rest of the season. This year, the Jayhawks have found ways to win those games, and Selden is still trying to single out a reason for this.

“I don’t know what it is, but it’s a totally different team than last year,” Selden said. “Those games last year, we didn’t pull through. We won a lot of games last year on just our skill — our skill level and just being better than people individually.”

For now, Kansas is again winning with defense and an offense-by-committee approach. For the last month, it hasn’t always been pretty. But it’s been effective, and to Selden, that part is no surprise.

“This year, we’re really having to buckle down, because we don’t have nowhere near the skill we had last year. So I think we’re taking it more serious, and we’re a tougher team this year.”

Reach Rustin Dodd at rdodd@wichitaeagle.com. Follow him on Twitter: @rustindodd.

No. 13 Utah vs. No. 10 Kansas

When: 2:15 p.m. Saturday

Where: Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo.

Records: Utah 7-1, KU 7-1

Radio: KFH, 1240-AM, 98.7-FM

TV: ESPN

No. 13 Utah vs. No. 10 Kansas

P

Utah

Ht

Yr

Pts

Reb

F

Chris Reyes

6-7

So.

4.6

4.4

F

Kenneth Ogbe

6-6

So.

7.1

2.9

C

Jakob Poeltl

7-0

Fr.

11.3

9.3

G

Delon Wright

6-5

Sr.

15.4

x-4.9

G

Brandon Taylor

5-10

Jr.

10.3

2.4

P

Kansas

Ht

Yr

Pts

Reb

F

Landen Lucas

6-10

So.

3.7

3.9

F

Perry Ellis

6-8

Jr.

14.6

7.1

G

Brannen Greene

6-7

So.

6.4

1.8

G

Wayne Selden

6-5

So.

9.3

3.4

G

Frank Mason

5-11

So.

10.6

x-3.4

x-assists

UTAH: The Utes’ only meeting with Kansas also came in Kansas City, on Nov. 25, 1995, at Kemper Arena. The Jayhawks won 79-68 in a matchup that featured seven future NBA first-round picks. For Utah, this will be the first time they’ve played a top-10 team while ranked in the top 15 since facing Kentucky in the 1998 NCAA championship game. The Utes have already proven they can beat a top-10 team, defeating then-No. 8 Wichita State at home Dec. 3. The Utes’ only loss came at then-No. 16 San Diego State on Nov. 18. Wright, whose brother, Dorell, plays for the Portland Trail Blazers, is on the watch list for the Wooden Award, given to the nation’s best player. The Utes are solid on both offense and defense, but not elite in either category. They rank 36th nationally in offensive efficiency, according to KenPom.com, while ranking 28th in defense.

KANSAS: During a six-game winning streak, the Jayhawks have been a tough team to scout. “Teams don’t really know what we’re going to do, because we don’t really know what we’re going to come out and do sometimes,” Selden said. That’s most true on offense. The Jayhawks rank 10th in the country in offensive efficiency, but much of their success has come at the free-throw line. KU has made 171 free throws on the season, while its opponents have attempted 151 free throws. The discrepancy has helped the Jayhawks win a cluster of tight games. For the season, though, Kansas is shooting 43.7 percent from inside the three-point line, which would be the worst mark of the Bill Self era. The Jayhawks usually thrive on inside scoring, and to this point, they have struggled to score over length.

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