Sports

Nick Collison, Warren Jabali headline 2019 class for Kansas Sports Hall of Fame

In this Eagle file photo, Kansas forward Nick Collison drives around Kansas State’s Matt Siebrandt in the second half of their game in Manhattan on Feb. 8, 2003. Collison was announced Thursday as part of the 2019 class for the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame.
In this Eagle file photo, Kansas forward Nick Collison drives around Kansas State’s Matt Siebrandt in the second half of their game in Manhattan on Feb. 8, 2003. Collison was announced Thursday as part of the 2019 class for the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. The Wichita Eagle

The Kansas Sports Hall of Fame announced its 2019 class on Thursday with headliners such as Nick Collison, a two-time Big 12 selection at Kansas, basketball star Warren Jabali, who played in college at Wichita State, Kamerion Wimbley, a high school football All-American at Northwest who went on to play nine seasons in the NFL, and former WSU and major-league pitchers Mike Pelfrey and Nate Robertson.

The ceremony for the 13 inductees will be held Sunday, Oct. 6 at the Kansas Star Casino. Tickets can be purchased starting August 1 at www.kshof.org or by calling 316-262-2038.

Below is highlights of the 13 inductees:

Tammy Thomas Ammons: A two-time NCAA swimming national champion at Kansas, she won the 50-meter freestyle and the 100-meter free in 1983. Ended her career as a 17-time All-American, a 12-time conference champion and set the American record in the 100 free and 50 free set in 1983.

Gene Bissell: A former football coach and athletic director at Kansas Wesleyan from 1952-78, a span where he was a four-time KCAC coach of the year and won four conference championships. Also coached track and field, tennis, golf and basketball during his career,on top of teaching 44 classes.

Bob Chipman: Legendary basketball coach at Washburn for 38 years. He compiled a career record of 808-352 and became one of only 25 coaches in college basketball history with over 800 wins. Led Washburn to the 1987 NAIA national title and was a three-time MIAA coach of the year. Also played his final two years in college at Kansas State under Jack Hartman, helping lead the Wildcats to two Elite Eight appearances in 1972 and 1973.

Nick Collison: Carved out a standout basketball career at Kansas which included becoming a consensus All-American in 2003, a two-time Big 12 selection and the Big 12 and national player of the year in 2003. He ended his career at KU as the Big 12 all-time leader in scoring and rebounding and led the Jayhawks to two Final Four appearances in 2002 and 2003. He was drafted in the first round of the 2003 NBA Draft by the Seattle Supersonics and played 14 seasons with the same franchise, ending his career with the Oklahoma City Thunder and finishing with career averages of 5.9 points and 5.2 rebounds per game. His jersey was retired by KU in 2003 and by the Thunder in 2019.

Lauren Goehring Cost: All-American volleyball player at K-State, where she was named the Big 12 player of the year in 2003. She remains the only player in program history to achieve both milestones. As a senior in 2003, she guided K-State to the Big 12 title and a Sweet 16 berth in the NCAA Tournament.

Scott Hastings: Standout basketball career began at Independence, where he led the school to a state championship in 1978 and was named the Topeka Capital-Journal’s player of the year. He became a two-time All-American in 1981 and 1982 under Eddie Sutton at Arkansas, where he finished his career second in scoring and third in rebounding. He was drafted by the New York Knicks in the 1982 NBA Draft and played 11 seasons in the NBA, averaging 2.8 points and 2.2 rebounds per game and won a NBA championship in 1990 with the Detroit Pistons.

Warren Jabali (Armstrong): A three-time first-team All-Missouri Valley Conference basketball player from 1965-68 at Wichita State, where he averaged a double-double in points and rebounds as a sophomore and senior. He left WSU as the school’s all-time leader in assists, second in rebounds and fourth in scoring. He went on to be a four-time All-Star in the ABA, where he averaged 17.1 points, 5.3 assists and 6.7 rebounds per game for his professional career. Before his WSU playing days, Jabali, then known as Armstrong, was a big star in Kansas City at Central High.

Tom Meier: The first Kansas high school player to be named Mr. Kansas Basketball following an all-state career at Topeka Hayden, where he led the school to back-to-back state titles in 1982 and 1983. Went on to become a two-time All-American selection at Washburn, where he guided the Ichabods to the NAIA national championship in 1987 and finished his career as one of only two Washburn players to score 2,000 points and record 1,000 rebounds.

Mike Pelfrey: After a standout prep career at Wichita Heights, Pelfrey was a two-time All-American pitcher and Missouri Valley Conference pitcher of the year at Wichita State from 2003-2005. Finished his career at WSU with the all-time low mark in ERA at 2.18 and second in strikeouts at 366. He was drafted in the first round of the 2005 MLB Draft by the New York Mets and went on to play 12 seasons in the MLB with a career record of 68-103 with a 4.68 ERA and 838 strikeouts for the Mets, Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox.

Nate Robertson: Set the state record for career ERA (0.79) at Maize High from 1992-95 and was named the Kansas player of the year in 1995. He won three NBC World Series as a player and also became a two-time All-Missouri Valley Conference pick at Wichita State. He finished with two undefeated seasons at WSU, then was drafted in the fifth round of the 1999 MLB Draft by the Florida Marlins. He played nine seasons in the MLB, compiling a 55-77 career record with a 5.01 ERA and 775 strikeouts for the Marlins, Detroit Tigers and Philadelphia Phillies.

Fred Slaughter: State champion in the 100-meter dash at the 1959 Kansas high school track and field meet as a senior at Topeka High, where he was a successful three-sport athlete in football, basketball and track. He went on to become a three-year letterman in basketball at UCLA under John Wooden from 1960-64. Was named the UCLA freshman MVP in 1961 and ended his college career second in school history in rebounds and averaged 8.8 points and 9.1 rebounds per game in his career. He was a member of UCLA’s first national championship team in 1964, then became a professional sports agent following his playing career.

Roy Turner: The head coach for the Wichita Wings from 1979-86 and 1990-94, Turner won 254 career games with the Wings, including the 1981 Major Indoor Soccer League Western Division championship. He led the Wings to the playoffs in 10 of 11 seasons. He was also a professional soccer player for 11 years and was a member of the 1973 United States National Team as a player. He has been the tournament director for the Wichita Open golf tournament since 1999.

Kamerion Wimbley: After an All-American prep career as a football player for Wichita Northwest, Wimbley went on to become a four-year letterman at Florida State. He was drafted No. 13 overall in the 2006 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns and played nine seasons in the NFL with the Browns, Oakland Raiders and Tennessee Titans. He recorded 322 career tackles, 53.5 sacks, two interceptions and eight forced fumbles.

  Comments