Editorials

King’s ideals

It is the world, and not just King’s country, that sorely needs to heed his counsel.
It is the world, and not just King’s country, that sorely needs to heed his counsel.

Each Martin Luther King Jr. Day presents the nation with an opportunity to measure its progress on the civil rights icon’s agenda, with the past year standing out for the pain and dissent caused by fatal encounters between police and African-Americans.

What would King say? Likely that we can and must do better, and that it should go without saying that black lives matter because all lives do.

But he also had much to say about far more than race relations, which makes all of his guidance as valuable today as it was when he was cut down so cruelly by an assassin’s bullet in 1968.

It is the world, and not just King’s country, that sorely needs to heed his counsel about the destructive futility of violence, the imperative of justice and the necessity of learning, as he said in his 1964 Nobel Lecture, “the simple art of living together as brothers.”

The community can pay tribute to the man and his legacy at noon Monday, at the Greater Wichita Ministerial League’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration at Wichita State University’s Hughes Metropolitan Complex, 29th Street North and Oliver.

And it can and should commit to being more faithful and tireless in service to his ideals.

For the editorial board, Rhonda Holman

  Comments