Weather News

Storm may bring hail, damaging winds, flooding and tornadoes to central Kansas, NWS says

Learn about the different types of thunderstorms

Learn the difference between all the different types of thunderstorms from single cell storms, multi-cell clusters, squall lines, and supercells.
Up Next
Learn the difference between all the different types of thunderstorms from single cell storms, multi-cell clusters, squall lines, and supercells.

Update, 8:50 p.m.:

The NWS office in Topeka said the Wabaunsee County sheriff reported a tornado on the ground east of Alta Vista.

Update, 8:15 p.m.:

A tornado has touched down in central Kansas, weather officials said.

The National Weather Service office in Topeka said a spotter reported a brief tornado on the ground in eastern Geary County.

Hail stones as large as 2 inches have been reported northwest of Manhattan in Riley County.

Update, 6:10 p.m.:

The National Weather Service has issued a tornado watch for several counties in northern Kansas.

The tornado watch, which runs through midnight, calls for a possibility of tornadoes, scattered hail up to the size of tennis balls and scattered wind gusts up to 70 mph.

Counties include Anderson, Chase, Clay, Cloud, Coffey, Dickinson, Douglas, Ellsworth, Franklin, Geary, Lincoln, Lyon, Marion, Marshall, McPherson, Mitchell, Morris, Nemaha, Osage, Ottawa, Pattawatomie, Republic, Riley, Russell, Saline, Shawnee, Wabaunsee and Washington.

Original story:

A storm moving through Kansas may bring dangerous weather to the central part of the state Thursday evening.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service office in Wichita predict a risk for severe thunderstorms across central Kansas before it moves to the south-central and southeast parts of the state.

The threat includes “the potential for very large hail in excess of two inches in diameter and damaging winds to 75 mph. A brief tornado is also possible until dark,” forecasters said in a hazardous weather outlook issued at around 4 p.m. Heavy rain may bring localized flooding.

The greatest severe weather risks are in central and northeast Kansas before 10 p.m. As the storm moves south and east, the risk includes smaller hail — up to the size of a quarter — and damaging winds of 60-70 mph with minor lowland flooding.

In Wichita, the NWS predicts a 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly between 9 p.m. and 4 a.m. Wind gusts in the city could reach 25 mph. City officials said in a tweet that stormwater crews will be on call to respond.

Photos and videos of storms and damage can be submitted to The Eagle online at www.kansas.com/customer-service/submit-photo/.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.

  Comments