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How do you spell ... ? This is the word people misspell most in your state

America's most misspelled words, according to Google Trends.
America's most misspelled words, according to Google Trends. @GoogleTrends, Twitter

Some words are easier to spell than others.

That's why it should come as no surprise that the most misspelled word in six different states is "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious," at least according to Google Trends.

But that doesn't explain how 11 different states need Google's help to spell "beautiful" — that's America's most misspelled word, Google says.

Google looked up the top searched "how to spell" words in each state from May 2017 to May 2018. That means Google analyzed when people typed "How to spell (insert word here)" into the search engine.

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The words were then placed in a Google-colored map that shows the word people in your state mispell — I mean, misspell — the most. The map was released just in time for Thursday's Scripps Spelling Bee finals.

The three most misspelled words, according to Google, are beautiful, supercalifragilisticexpialidocious and resume.

The good news is you don't have to spell resume on your resume. Talking to you, Colorado, New York and New Jersey.

Two states need help spelling "canceled" (one 'l' — not two), another two need help spelling "sincerely" and two others want to know how to spell "schedule."

Kansans should hope that there are no consequences for not knowing how to spell "consequences" — that's the Sunflower State's most misspelled word.

North Dakotan residents want to spell "yacht" correctly, and Floridians wonder about "Hors d'oeuvres" — fancy, fancy.

People in New Mexico want to know about "permanent," while Washington, D.C., residents question "permanently."

Maine residents don't know how to spell "Connecticut" — and it's only a few states away.

And in Alabama, people struggle with spelling "cousin."

See Google's complete map of America's most misspelled words below:

Eva Vega, of the Union County Schools, did and won the 64th annual Charlotte Observer Spelling Bee over 24 other spellers from across the Charlotte region.

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