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Caller feared ‘deranged’ man hugging a pillow in the cold, MN cops say. It was no man

This cardboard cutout of the MyPillow CEO led to a police welfare check in Minnesota, police said.
This cardboard cutout of the MyPillow CEO led to a police welfare check in Minnesota, police said. Jordan (MN) Police Department

A “man” was standing motionless in the Minnesota cold last week, and while he didn’t have a coat on, he did have a pillow to hug.

A concerned citizen in a Jordan, Minnesota, neighborhood noticed the “man” and called the cops to request a welfare check on “the adult male in need of possible assistance,” according to a Facebook post from the Jordan Police Department.

“The caller certainly was not wanting to get too close thinking who is this deranged person standing outside in the cold hugging a pillow,” police said on Facebook. “Always better to call the police.”

So, when the responding officers got to the scene, they found the “man” who they were supposed to check on.

But it was no man at all. Well, not a “real” man, that is.

Rather, it was just a cardboard cutout of MyPillow CEO and inventor Mike Lindell, police said. And yes, he was hugging a white pillow while in his blue dress shirt and black pants.

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“Those cardboard cutouts sure can look real from a distance,” police said.

MyPillow’s CEO shared the police department’s Feb. 28 Facebook post.

“Unreal!” Lindell wrote.

The pillow company is based out of Chaska, Minnesota, which is about 10 miles north of Jordan, according to its Facebook page.

Another not-so-real man has also prompted some 911 calls in Minnesota this year, FOX9 reported.

There’s a sculpture of a homeless Jesus at Basilica of St. Mary in Minneapolis that looks like a real person, according to the station.

“It is, indeed, very lifelike and intentionally so – the artist wanted people to, from a distance, to have the notion this is a real person,” Johan Van Parys with the Basilica said, according to FOX9. “Someone had come and put a blanket over the sculpture. It was a red blanket, very visible, and I thought, ‘here, the sculpture is working.’”

The Williamson County Sheriff's Office, north of Austin, Texas is testing cardboard cutouts of deputies holding radar guns in school zones in an effort to get drivers to slow down on their morning commutes.

Kaitlyn Alanis is based out of Kansas and reports on news from across the Midwest region. She has been at The Wichita Eagle since 2017.

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