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Cops sled as a ‘safety check’ after they were called on kids having fun, video shows

Watch Noblesville police sled down snowy slope

Noblesville officers got a call that kids were sledding into a dangerous area. Once they arrived they determined that the kids were being safe and responsible and not in a dangerous area.
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Noblesville officers got a call that kids were sledding into a dangerous area. Once they arrived they determined that the kids were being safe and responsible and not in a dangerous area.

Kids in a central Indiana city were taking advantage of a snowy slope when someone called the cops on them, the Noblesville Police Department posted to Facebook on Saturday.

The caller told police the “kids were sledding into a dangerous area,” according to the post, so a couple of officers went to check out the icy hill themselves.

“Once they arrived they determined that the kids were being safe and responsible and not in a dangerous area,” the department posted.

But, just to be sure, two officers decided to “take a test run, for safety reasons and stuff” — and that “safety check” was captured on video.

The 14-second video posted to Facebook shows the two officers at the top of the hill, each holding a sled.

As soon as someone said “ready,” the uniformed cops ran a couple of steps before jumping onto their sleds and sledding down the slope.

Kids can be heard laughing in the background as soon as one of the officers hit a little speed bump made of snow.

“Well, we survived,” one of the officers said as they got up from their sleds.

This isn’t the first time responding officers have joined in a game or activity after they were called on people having fun.

In December, officers in Minnesota were responding to a noise complaint and found out it was some adults playing Super Smash Brothers, McClatchy reported.

“This kind of thing actually happens more than people know. Our officers have been known to go out on calls and wind up playing catch, shooting hoops and, yes, even playing video games,” public information coordinator Steve Linders told McClatchy. “It’s community engagement, which is part of our DNA. It’s also a great way to get to know the people we serve — and a lot of fun.”

In March 2018, Florida deputies joined kids in a game of pickup basketball after responding to a noise complaint, McClatchy reported.

And in 2016, a Gainesville, Florida, police officer joined a basketball game after a noise complaint.

“To the original noise complainant on the basketball noise: Hope we weren’t too loud yesterday,” the Gainesville Police Department tweeted — along with the hashtag, #HoopsNotCrime.

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