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Giant gator turns up on Louisiana doorstep. ‘Always look before you step,’ deputies warn

A giant alligator turned up on the front doorstep of a home in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, St. Martin Parish deputies said. A patrol deputy helped remove it and warned residents to “look before you step.”
A giant alligator turned up on the front doorstep of a home in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, St. Martin Parish deputies said. A patrol deputy helped remove it and warned residents to “look before you step.” St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office

A home in Louisiana got a surprise visitor at the front door on Friday afternoon — and it wasn’t an early trick-or-treater.

There was a large alligator right in front of the door, lying on a mat and splayed lazily between the house and a flower pot, photos show. A pair of shoes lay abandoned near the huge reptile.

“Always look before you step!” the St. Martin Parish Sheriff’s Office warned in a Facebook post, sharing pictures of the encounter.

Within hours, the post had been shared more than 500 times.

The resident who discovered the gator lives in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, and a patrol deputy helped remove the gator from the home, KATC reports.

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Another photo shows the alligator in a slightly different position. St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office

“Just another day in the life of a St. Martin Parish Sheriff’s Office Patrol Deputy,” the sheriff’s office wrote on Facebook.

Facebook commenters were awed — and terrified — by the beast.

Some just worried about whoever the shoes belonged to

“What happened to the person that was wearing that tennis shoe?” one Facebook user asked.

Alligators that are smaller than 4 feet in length are scared of people, and usually don’t threaten livestock or pets either, according to Louisiana’s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

“Most alligators, if left alone, will move on,” the department said.

But larger alligators that pose a threat to people or animals can be considered “nuisance alligators,” which can be reported to the state and removed. Alligator hunters can charge residents up to $30 for getting rid of the animal if it’s less than 6 feet long.

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