Education

This Wichita school wants kids to stop bringing ‘happy crack’ to class

Wichita school officials say students should not bring a mixture of Kool-Aid and sugar, known as “happy crack,” to school.
Wichita school officials say students should not bring a mixture of Kool-Aid and sugar, known as “happy crack,” to school. File photo

Officials at one Wichita middle school are asking parents to make sure their children aren’t bringing a candy substance known as “happy crack” to school.

The principal at Truesdell Middle School in south Wichita sent an e-mail to families Monday saying that teachers have seen an increase in powder candy being brought to school in plastic bags.

“This candy comes in the form of Kool-Aid mixed with sugar or crushed Smarties. . . . Many students have been referring to this substance as ‘Happy Crack,’” the e-mail said.

“There have been several instances where it has caused a disruption to our school day. If a student is caught with the powder candy, there will be administrative consequences.”

Susan Arensman, spokeswoman for the Wichita school district, said she hadn’t heard about the issue being a problem at other Wichita schools.

The phenomenon isn’t new, however.

In 2011, officials at a Maize elementary school asked parents to talk to their children about drug prevention after some fifth-graders allegedly sold baggies of Kool-Aid and sugar to classmates on the bus, calling it “happy crack.”

Students elsewhere have been suspended when they were caught with the colored sugar mixture because, by resembling an illicit substance, it violated school policy.

Videos about how to make “happy crack” can be found on YouTube, and the substance has its own definition on UrbanDictionary.com:

“Happy Crack is NOT a drug, but should still be used responsibly,” the site says. “Side effects can include sinus headache (when inhaled nasally), weight gain, cavities, and a temporary red mouth.”

House + Home editor Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian experiments with dyeing Easter eggs first using shaving cream and gel food coloring, then Kool-Aid. One method turned out great. The other one? Not so much.

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