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Why Monday’s supermoon is the most super it’s been since 1948

Nov. 14 supermoon is closest moon to Earth since 1948

The supermoon on Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, is expected to be "super" for two reasons: It is the only supermoon this year to be completely full, and it is the closest moon to Earth since 1948. (Courtesy of NASA)
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The supermoon on Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, is expected to be "super" for two reasons: It is the only supermoon this year to be completely full, and it is the closest moon to Earth since 1948. (Courtesy of NASA)

This won’t be your average full moon.

Monday’s supermoon will be the biggest, brightest and closest it’s been to Earth in almost 70 years.

The moon’s orbit around our planet is elliptical, meaning the distance from Earth varies: sometimes it’s further away, sometimes it’s closer.

“When the moon is full as it makes its closest pass to Earth, it is known as a supermoon,” according to NASA. “The full moon appears that much larger in diameter and because it is larger shines 30 percent more moonlight onto the Earth.”

Oct. 16 was the last supermoon. Monday's moon will be its closest pass to Earth as a full moon since 1948.

“We won’t see another supermoon like this until 2034,” according to NASA.

If you want to mark your calendars, that’s Nov. 25, 2034, to be precise.

But if you do miss Monday's supermoon, there will be another supermoon on Dec. 14.

That means we will see three straight supermoons to round out 2016.

The rare supermoon lunar eclipse was captured in the U.S. and many other counties Sunday night.

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