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Meteor shower to peak Friday night

NASA’s tips for best meteor shower viewing

Rhiannon Blaauw, of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office — located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. — shares some tips and strategies to best view a meteor shower, such as the Perseid shower. (courtesy of NASA)
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Rhiannon Blaauw, of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office — located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. — shares some tips and strategies to best view a meteor shower, such as the Perseid shower. (courtesy of NASA)

If you gaze skyward Friday night, you may see some shooting stars from Halley’s comet.

A medium-strength meteor shower named the Orionids could be visible.

“The Orionids, formed from the debris of Halley's comet, are known for being bright and quick,” according to NASA.

Halley’s comet pays the Earth a visit every 75 or 76 years. But the Earth is currently passing through a field of debris the comet left behind, which results in meteor showers.

Friday night could produce about 20 meteors per hour, according to NASA. Observers can try to see the Orionids away from the city lights at the Lake Afton Public Observatory near Goddard.

“People are more than welcome to come out and watch meteors at the observatory,” said Harold Henderson, the observatory’s director.

Henderson said people should bring lawn chairs or their own telescopes because the observatory’s indoors telescope won’t help them view the Orionids.

“The observatory telescope inside the dome is probably the worst instrument possible to watch meteors with,” he said.

They’re named the Orionids because they can appear near the constellation Orion.

Daniel Salazar: 316-269-6791, @imdanielsalazar

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