Aviation

Max Aerostructures acquires El Dorado machine shop

Max Aerostructures moves in

The city’s newest aircraft supplier has completed an acquisition of an El Dorado machine shop and moved in about a dozen pieces of equipment.
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The city’s newest aircraft supplier has completed an acquisition of an El Dorado machine shop and moved in about a dozen pieces of equipment.

The city’s newest aircraft supplier has completed an acquisition of an El Dorado machine shop and moved in about a dozen pieces of equipment.

Sean Purcell, Max Aerostructures executive vice president and general manager, said Wednesday his company has completed its acquisition of Paradigm Machine, an 11-year-old company that manufactures parts primarily for Tier II aircraft suppliers.

The acquisition included machining equipment, Paradigm’s book of business and its 18 employees. Paradigm’s founders and owners, Ryan Hollingsworth and Alan Bernbeck, have also joined Max as managers.

“It just looked like a good opportunity,” Hollingsworth said of the acquisition, adding that joining Max AeroStructures gives his former company the capability to do new and larger aircraft parts.

Paradigm also was a supplier to Exacta Aerospace when Purcell was there, giving him “comfort” in knowing “what they’re capable of.”

“I’m very pleased with the progress we’ve made so far,” Purcell said. “It was a big, blank canvas when we started, and now we’re beginning to paint it.”

Purcell and three other former managers of Exacta Aerospace – Jeff Pauli, Brian Mann and Jarrod Younglaunched Max in September, opening in a 206,000-square-foot building Max acquired from Bombardier Business Aircraft at 8219 W. Irving. Birds Eye Holdings, a private equity firm the Voegeli family started after it sold Exacta to Precision Castparts three years ago, is the majority owner of Max.

Ultimately, Purcell wants the company to be a supplier of large and small parts and assemblies to other aircraft suppliers and manufacturers.

But getting there will take some time. Max has moved in about a dozen pieces of equipment to its building, including three-, four-, and five-axis CNC machines. It also has equipment to cut and drill sheet metal, as well as to do chemical processing and heat-treat parts.

Purcell estimates it will be another month to six weeks to strategically place those machines and establish an operating system. It also plans to pursue a re-certification audit for its quality processes, hopefully in December.

He said Max officials continue to have discussions with manufacturers about new business but want to have everything in place before they take on additional work.

“It’s going to be a very measured approach … to going to the OEMs in town,” he said.

Jerry Siebenmark: 316-268-6576, @jsiebenmark

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