Air Capital Insider

Southwest Airlines testing two-door deplaning

Southwest Airlines airplanes parked at the gates at San Jose International Airport.
Southwest Airlines airplanes parked at the gates at San Jose International Airport. The Wichita Eagle

Southwest Airlines is testing a way to quickly deplane passengers.

The airline that serves Wichita Eisenhower National Airport began testing deboarding passengers on June 1 through the front and rear cabin doors on the left side of its Boeing 737 airplanes at two California airports: San Jose International Airport and Sacramento International Airport.

Passengers who deboard from the rear of the airplane use jet stairs to get onto the tarmac, while those in the front of the airplane use the jet bridge.

The test is scheduled to end on Tuesday.

Southwest spokeswoman Casey Dunn said in an e-mail on Friday dual-door deplaning has been expanded to include airports in Burbank, Calif., and Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

“During the test, Southwest is deplaning as many inbound flights as possible through both available left side passenger doors,” Dunn said. “The test period will help Southwest determine when to use dual door deplaning, and to identify whether or not this process can be expanded to more airports across the network.”

At the four airports where it has implemented two-door deplaning, it has “proven successful in improving both on time performance as well as the Customer Experience,” Dunn said.

Dunn said following the end of the test airline officials will analyze the results and determine the next steps for whether to expand dual-door deplaning.

Jerry Siebenmark: 316-268-6576, @jsiebenmark

  Comments