Dining With Denise Neil

Coffee shop, food trucks team up to solve a noisy, costly problem

Let’m Eat Brats and other food trucks now can plug in at Reverie Coffee Roasters, meaning there’s no need for their noisy, gas-guzzling generator.
Let’m Eat Brats and other food trucks now can plug in at Reverie Coffee Roasters, meaning there’s no need for their noisy, gas-guzzling generator.

The food truck experience in front of Reverie Coffee Roasters, the shop at 2611 E. Douglas, is about to become much more pleasant.

Reverie has teamed up with two local food trucks to split the cost of a 220-volt outdoor outlet that will prevent the trucks from needing to fire up their noisy, costly generators when serving outside the shop.

Reverie owner Andrew Gough said he was approached by Let’m Eat Brats co-owner Austin English with the idea of installing the plug. He suggested that the two businesses split the cost since it could benefit them both. Customers are drawn to Gough’s business by the presence of the food trucks, he said. And Austin and his wife, Manu, usually must fill their 10-gallon generator with gas three times a week – more in the summer when the air conditioner is running.

But with the presence of a plug, the truck can power up without using the generator.

Gough called the Flying Stove, and owners Jeff and Rob Schauf agreed to go in on the cost, also. The three businesses all contributed around $200, Gough said.

Let’m Eat Brats will use the plug for the first time when it sets up outside of Reverie from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. this afternoon. The Flying Stove will be there from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Gough said he will allow other trucks to use the plug-in, too, but might charge them a small day fee of $10 or $15. He anticipates that Reverie’s food truck visits will increase from a couple of times a month to once a week.

“There are no loud noises for our customers, and it’s also better for the environment,” Manu English said. “It’s a great example of the local community coming together.”

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