Books

Best-sellers from Watermark Books and Eighth Day Books (May 8)

Watermark Books & Cafe

Best-sellers

1. “The Raven King” by Maggie Stiefvater

2. “The Raven Boys” by Maggie Stiefvater

3. “What She Knew” by Gilly MacMillan

4. “A Day with Cionderella” by Little Bee Books

5. “My Sunshine Away” by M. O. Walsh

6. “The Little Paris Bookshop” by Nina George

7. “Trespassing Across America” by Ken Ilgunas

8. “City of Secrets” by Stuart O’Nan

9. “Excellent Lombards” by Jane Hamilton

10. “Margaret the First” by Danielle Dutton

New and notable

“Everybody’s Fool” by Richard Russo (Knopf, $27.95) – Richard Russo returns to North Bath, in upstate New York, and the characters who made “Nobody’s Fool” memorable. Watermark has a limited number of signed copies available.

“Zero K” by Don DeLillo (Scribner, $27) – DeLillo’s richest, wisest and most moving novel since “Underworld,” his funniest since “White Noise,” is an ode to language, the heart of our humanity, a meditation on death and an embrace of life.

Eighth Day Books

Best-sellers

1. “Oryx and Crake” by Margaret Atwood

2. “All the Pretty Horses” by Cormac McCarthy

3. “The Outsiders” by S.E. Hinton

4. “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote

5 “Invisible Man” Ralph Ellison

6. “Bless Me, Ultima” by Raymond Anaya

7. “How to Read Literature Like a Professor” by Thomas Foster

8. “Laurus: A Novel” by Eugene Vodolazkin

9. “The Services of Great and Holy Week and Pascha” ed. by Fr. John Winfrey

10. “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio

New and notable

“Salt to the Sea: A Novel by Ruta Sepetys” (Philomel, $18.99). World War II is drawing to a close in East Prussia and thousands of refugees are on a desperate trek toward freedom. Among them are Joana, Emilia, and Florian, whose paths converge en route to the ship that promises salvation. Just when it seems freedom is within their grasp, tragedy strikes.

“Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More – Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist” by Karen Swallow Prior (Thomas Nelson, $24.99). The enthralling biography of the woman writer who helped end the slave trade, changed Britain’s upper classes and taught a nation how to read. Hannah More’s life intersected those of John Wesley and George Whitefield, the rise and influence of Evangelicalism and the convulsive effects of the French Revolution.

National best-sellers

Fiction

1. “Extreme Prey” by John Sandford (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

2. “The Last Mile” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

3. “The Obsession” by Nora Roberts (Berkley)

4. “The Nest” by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney (Ecco)

5. “As Time Goes By” by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster)

6. “Fool Me Once’ by Harlan Coben (Dutton)

7. “Eligible” by Curtis Sittenfeld (Random House)

8. “Hide Away” by Iris Johansen (St. Martin’s Press)

9. “Miller’s Valley” by Anna Quindlen (Random House)

10. “Property of a Noblewoman” by Danielle Steel (Delacorte Press)

Nonfiction

1. “The Rainbow Comes and Goes” by Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt (Harper)

2. “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi (Random House)

3. “The Ideal Team Player” by Paul Kalanithi (Random House)

4. “The Whole 30” by Hartwig/Hartwig (HMH)

5. “Cravings” by Chrissy Teigen and Adeena Sussman (Clarkson Potter)

6. “Deskbound” by Kelly Starrett (Victory Belt)

7. “The Third Wave” by Steve Case (Simon & Schuster)

8. “It’s All Easy” by Gwyneth Paltrow (Grand Central Life & Style)

9. “Brave Enough” by Cheryl Strayed (Knopf)

10. “Minimalist Baker’s Everyday Cooking” by Dana Shultz (Avery)

Publishers Weekly

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