Wichita State Shockers

Wichita State completes 2018-19 roster with transfer known as "Teddy Buckets"

Teddy Allen, a 6-foot-5 small forward who is transferring from West Virginia, announced on his Twitter on Tuesday evening that he will transfer to Wichita State. He will sit out next season and be a redshirt sophomore in the 2019-20 season.
Teddy Allen, a 6-foot-5 small forward who is transferring from West Virginia, announced on his Twitter on Tuesday evening that he will transfer to Wichita State. He will sit out next season and be a redshirt sophomore in the 2019-20 season. AP file

The 2018-19 Wichita State roster has been completed with a transfer whose scoring prowess earned him the nickname "Teddy Buckets."

Teddy Allen, a 6-foot-5 small forward who is transferring from West Virginia, announced on his Twitter on Tuesday evening that he will transfer to WSU. He will sit out next season and be a redshirt sophomore in the 2019-20 season.

Allen was a scoring punch off the bench for a 26-win West Virginia team that advanced to the Sweet 16 and appeared to be a budding star in the Big 12. He played in 35 games and averaged 7.0 points and 2.7 rebounds in less than 12 minutes.

The appeal for WSU in Allen is clear: instant offense for the 2019-20 season.

Allen has a track record of filling up buckets everywhere he's been. In high school, he averaged 31.6 points his senior year at Boys Town High and won the Nebraska Gatorade Player of the Year Award in 2017. Then Allen led West Virginia in per-40-minute scoring at 23.1 points, which would have been just a tick below WSU's team leader, Shaquille Morris, at 23.6.

What makes Allen's effectiveness at a high Division I level all the more impressive is that he's doing it without an effective jump shot. According to Synergy's shot chart logs, just under a a third of Allen's shot selection last season came on jump shots farther than five feet from the basket and he shot 23.2 percent (13 of 56) on such attempts.

Where Allen excelled at West Virginia is close to the basket, whether it was finishing over a taller defender on a driving layup or using his size advantage (215 pounds) to bully smaller defenders with a slick array of post moves. Allen generated 71 percent of his offense on shots five feet or closer to the rim and made a solid 56 percent of those attempts.

In the limited minutes he did play, Allen shot early and often. According to KenPom, 29 percent of his team's possessions ended with an Allen shot when he was on the floor, by far the highest on WVU. The closest comparison on WSU last season would have been Morris and Darral Willis, who both shot nearly 27 percent of the time.

Allen also shows a penchant for rebounding. He grabbed a high rate of offensive rebounds when he was on the floor and could give WSU an advantage if he plays minutes at small forward. Allen also appears to hold his own on the defensive end, as well.

Allen had a breakout stretch to begin Big 12 play where he scored 15 points against Oklahoma State, 22 against Kansas State, and 20 against Oklahoma in consecutive games, but his minutes were spotty after that. He did average 11.3 points in West Virginia's three NCAA Tournament games.

A setback to adding Allen is that it enlarges the senior class of 2022, as he will join Rod Brown, Jamarius Burton, Erik Stevenson, Chance Moore, Dexter Dennis, Morris Udeze and Isaiah Chandler as an 8-person group. Although everyone but Brown is eligible to redshirt this coming season to break up the classes.

But if Allen's offense translates, then he could be a fixture for the Shockers for three years.

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