Special Reports

Paisley's dad helps with CPR on arena employee

Doug Paisley, father of country music artist Brad Paisley, helped give CPR to a man who was having a heart attack before his son's concert Saturday at Intrust Bank Arena. He retired in June as assistant fire chief in Glen Dale, W.Va.
Doug Paisley, father of country music artist Brad Paisley, helped give CPR to a man who was having a heart attack before his son's concert Saturday at Intrust Bank Arena. He retired in June as assistant fire chief in Glen Dale, W.Va. Courtesy Schmidt Relations

Doug Paisley says he was simply in the right place at the right time when he helped give CPR to a man who was having a heart attack before his son's concert Saturday at Intrust Bank Arena.

A longtime volunteer firefighter and EMT, Paisley said he noticed an arena employee on the floor in a service hallway and performed CPR before paramedics arrived. He was just about to use an automated external defibrillator — or AED — when paramedics took over.

"I had the AED open, ready to attach it," Paisley said Tuesday. "I kind of backed off and let them use theirs."

Paisley credited another arena employee with helping him assist the man. He was adamant that it was a team effort.

Steve Cotter, director of Sedgwick County EMS, said crews were on the way to the arena to work the concert when the man suffered a heart attack. Paramedics arrived in about three minutes.

"There were a couple of gentlemen doing citizen CPR on him," Cotter said. "One of them happened to be Brad Paisley's father, but we didn't know that at the time."

Cotter said paramedics "got a pulse back" and transported the man to a hospital.

"Definitely it helped sustain the gentleman until we got there," Cotter said of Paisley and the other man's efforts.

The employee's condition was unavailable Tuesday.

CPR and quick access to a defibrillator are keys to surviving a heart attack, Cotter said. The arena has six automated external defibrillators on site — four on the main public concourse levels.

Paisley said he doesn't always travel with his son but helps drive a tour bus sometimes.

Rendering aid to someone in distress is "just second nature to me," he said. He said he retired in June as assistant fire chief in Glen Dale, W.Va.

"If the man's life was saved, it was because a lot of things came together," he said. "There's nothing heroic about this. Heroic is when you're standing on the front lines in Afghanistan or Iraq. ... It was definitely a good thing to walk away from."

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