Elections

Update, 9:15 p.m.: Logan is apparent winner in at-large school board race

The Wichita school board race to watch Tuesday is between at-large candidates Joseph Shepard and Sheril Logan, who in the August primary had 29.9 percent and 32.7 percent of the vote respectively.
The Wichita school board race to watch Tuesday is between at-large candidates Joseph Shepard and Sheril Logan, who in the August primary had 29.9 percent and 32.7 percent of the vote respectively. File photo

Update, 9:15 p.m.: Sheril Logan is the apparent winner of the at-large school district seat, with almost 53 percent to Joseph Shepard’s more than 46 percent.

The number of provisional ballots in this and other races will be released on Wednesday.

Results of the school board races and the city races are not final until the canvas on Nov. 15.

The District 4 race is much closer with Stan Reeser at 50 percent to James W. Kilpatrick’s 49 percent.

Update, 8:35 p.m.: Sheril Logan continues her 54 percent lead to Joseph Shepard’s almost 46 percent with nearly half of the precincts reporting.

In the District 4 race, James W. Kilpatrick is seeing some movement with almost 48 percent to Stan Reeser’s not quite 52 percent.

Update, 8:10 p.m.: With 41 of 142 precincts reporting, Sheril Logan leads with almost 54 percent to Joseph Shepard’s almost 46 percent.

Stan Reeser leads with almost 55 percent to James W. Kilpatrick’s almost 45 percent.

Update, 8 p.m.: With 14 of 142 precincts reporting, Sheril Logan leads with more than 54 percent to Joseph Shepard’s more than 45 percent.

Stan Reeser leads with almost 53 percent to James W. Kilpatrick’s more than 46 percent.

Ernestine Krehbiel, who is unopposed, has almost 98 percent of the vote.

Update, 7:30 p.m.: Sheril Logan leads in advance voting with 9,583 votes cast. She has just over 53 percent to Joseph Shepard’s 46 percent.

In District 4, Stan Reeser has almost 56 percent to and James W. Kilpatrick’s 43 percent with 8,726 votes cast.

Original story:

The Wichita school board race to watch Tuesday is between at-large candidates Joseph Shepard and Sheril Logan, who in the August primary had 29.9 percent and 32.7 percent of the vote respectively.

Logan, 74, has served on the board since 2011 with three stints as president and one as vice president.

This is the first race for Shepard, 26, who is the director of multicultural engagement and campus life at Newman University and was the two-time president of the Wichita State University student body while in school there.

Both Logan and Shepard have a heart for the less fortunate, they say.

Shepard said his life — from a life of poverty to a life of advocacy — makes him a good fit for a school district where roughly 76.5% of students receive free or reduced-price lunches.

Logan said she also grew up in poverty and worked her whole career with the less fortunate in mind.

Since just before the primary, Logan raised $10,070 and had almost $12,500 cash on hand.

In the same time period, Shepard raised $5,226 and had almost $5,760 cash on hand.

The only other contested school board race is in District 4, which represents southwest Wichita, between Stan Reeser and James W. Kilpatrick Jr.

Reeser, 57, was appointed to the board in 2017 to fill the unexpired term of former board member Jeff Davis. He said he decided to run for a full term to continue his work on behalf of students and employees and to advocate for meaningful connections between the district and the larger community.

Kilpatrick, 72, is a retired captain of Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport’s Police and Fire Department who wants to bring the Bible back to the schools, teach patriotism and ban troublemakers from the district.

Ernestine Krehbiel, the District 3 incumbent from south-central Wichita, is running unopposed.

The retired high school history and government teacher was appointed to the board in December 2017. Her district includes parts of south and southeast Wichita.

Board members set policy and oversee a budget of $761 million for a district with about 50,600 students — the state’s largest. Members serve four-year terms and earn no pay for twice-monthly meetings and other work.

There are a number of issues facing the district, including aging buildings, difficultly in filling open positions — particularly in math, special education and science — and more than 35,000 children who are considered “at risk” with issues that affect their behavior and ability to achieve at school.

Carrie Rengers has been a reporter for almost three decades, including 16 years at The Wichita Eagle. Her Have You Heard? column of business scoops runs five days a week in The Eagle. If you have a tip, please e-mail or tweet her or call 316-268-6340.
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