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Baby survived brain surgery after falling from the bed. But 'he's very different' now

Colton Linton, of Trumann, Arkansas, fell off the bed in March. He fractured his skull and needed emergency brain surgery. Doctors didn't think he would survive, but he lived. However, his mom says he's not the same now.
Colton Linton, of Trumann, Arkansas, fell off the bed in March. He fractured his skull and needed emergency brain surgery. Doctors didn't think he would survive, but he lived. However, his mom says he's not the same now. Paige Ferguson/GoFundMe

Doctors were not confident infant Colton Linton would live after he went into a 10-minute cardiac arrest during his emergency brain surgery.

“They didn’t think he would live at all," his mom, Paige Ferguson, told People. "I walked into the ICU after his surgery and the doctor came up to me. Her exact words were, ‘Ma’am, I need you to understand that most likely your son is going to die from this.'"

Colton, of Trumann, Arkansas, had fallen off a bed that was just 2 feet off the ground, his mom wrote on a GoFundMe fundraising page.

People magazine reported that it was a queen-sized bed, and both of his parents were hanging out with friends at the time of the fall on March 17. He was just one day shy of turning 6 months old, Babble reported, and he was surrounded by pillows.

Ferguson was in a nearby room and heard the "loud thud." She told People that she knew it was the sound of Colton hitting the floor.

"Because we are paranoid parents, we decided to get him evaluated," Ferguson posted on the GoFundMe. "We thought for sure they were going to say he hit his head, has a bump, and he will be fine."

But he wasn't fine.

Rather, he "suffered severe brain damage," his mom posted on Facebook.

A CT scan showed that Colton fractured his skull, People reported, and he underwent brain surgeries and more than 12 blood transfusions.

He stayed in the hospital for a month before he was able to go home.

The return home was a surprise to the medical staff, People reported on Monday.

“It was amazing. Colton was a miracle," Ferguson said. "At all of our follow-up appointments, the doctors have said, ‘I’m not trying to be mean, but your child should be dead. People do not live through the injury he had. He is absolutely a miracle."

While Ferguson knows it's a miracle her baby is alive, she says he hasn't been the same since the brain injury.

“He’s very different. He’s not the same Colton that he was before," she told People. "Even right before his accident he was constantly babbling at us ... He doesn’t babble anymore. He’s irritable all the time. He’s very stiff. I could be holding him, and I miss him so much.”

Ferguson told People that doctors expect Colton to have celebral palsy when he grows up, which would affect body movement and muscle coordination.

“I will do everything in my power to ensure he has a happy life," his mom said. "I really think he’s going to do more than what (the doctors) think he will. But I’m also very fearful for his future.”

Now, Ferguson says she needs Colton to be an advocate for others.

"I need people to realize the seriousness of a head injury," she posted to Facebook. " ... I need you to hear me...get your kids checked out! Please. The old tale of 'if the bump is outward you're safe.' is NOT true."

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