Carrie Rengers

Who is buying ‘the first dadgum strong beer’ in Kansas Monday? This guy

Learn how to pour a glass of beer

David Reese, brewmaster for Chandeleur Island Brewing in downtown Gulfport, is one of only 78 Advanced Cicerones world-wide. In this video he teaches you how to properly pour a glass of beer.
Up Next
David Reese, brewmaster for Chandeleur Island Brewing in downtown Gulfport, is one of only 78 Advanced Cicerones world-wide. In this video he teaches you how to properly pour a glass of beer.

What kind of person would get up in the middle of the night to drive two and a half hours from Oklahoma to Kansas just to be the first person to buy strong beer when it’s available at convenience and grocery stores Monday at 6 a.m.?

The kind of person who has spent a quarter century lobbying to get strong beer passed through the Kansas Legislature.

Or, as Tulsa-based QuikTrip spokesman Mike Thornbrugh puts it, “Since I was a young man, and I’m no longer young.”

He plans to be at the QuikTrip near Central and I-235 by the company’s Wichita office in the 5 o’clock hour Monday.

“I’m going to buy the first dadgum strong beer at QuikTrip . . . one second after 6 a.m,” Thornbrugh says.

“There’s no way I’m going to miss that.”

Surely that’s not the only reason he’s driving so far?

“Yes, ma’am.”

Thornbrugh says it’ll also be nice to hear what QuikTrip customers are saying about the new opportunity, too.

He plans to buy two 12-packs, but he won’t say what kind of beer because he’s buying one for a friend and wants it to be a surprise.

Though he’s got something to celebrate, Thornbrugh still has a lot of work ahead of him.

For now, beer strength is capped at 6 percent for convenience and grocery stores. Thornbrugh says that hinders local brewers and others whose beers are stronger than that.

“Personally, I just think it’s foolish.”

Then there’s the fight for wine and liquor sales.

Thornbrugh says he thinks the public eventually will insist on the convenience of at least wine sales outside of liquor stores.

“We’re seeing it everywhere,” he says. “It’s really just a matter of time, sooner versus later, that the consumer’s going to demand a change.”

Though he’s buying his beer at 6 a.m. Monday, Thornbrugh says he won’t be drinking it then. Not only does he have to turn around and drive back to Tulsa, there’s also no drinking on the premises at QuikTrip.

“And I don’t break rules.”

  Comments