Carrie Rengers

Hawaiian food, prairie photos coming to East Douglas

Natalie Burris and her partner, Akamu Noble – shown with their daughter, Anuhea – are keeping their Noble House Hawaiian Plate Lunch food truck and starting a Noble House Hawaiian Foods restaurant, too.
Natalie Burris and her partner, Akamu Noble – shown with their daughter, Anuhea – are keeping their Noble House Hawaiian Plate Lunch food truck and starting a Noble House Hawaiian Foods restaurant, too. Photo courtesy of Juan Carlos Garcia

Have an appetite for Hawaiian food?

Are you a fan of prairie photos?

Both are coming to the shopping strip along East Douglas by Doolin-Shaw Optical.

Photographer John Morrison is moving his Prairie Vistas Gallery from the Grant Telegraph Centre in Old Town to 1,900 square feet at 3236 E. Douglas.

Natalie Burris, who owns the Noble House Hawaiian Plate Lunch food truck, is going to open Noble House Hawaiian Foods at 3238 E. Douglas on the other side of the optical business. That’s where Smarts Doughnut briefly was.

Craig Simon of Landmark Commercial Real Estate handled both deals.

Morrison says he wants a more traditional storefront space. Currently, he’s in an office environment.

With his new space, Morrison says, he’ll have the opportunity for foot traffic instead of people finding him strictly by word of mouth or his website.

The front two-thirds of his new space will be for Morrison’s gallery. The back third will be for his shop, which includes printing, framing and a digital darkroom.

Morrison says he hopes to open in the new space on Dec. 1. Look for more information closer to that time.

Burris and her professional and personal partner, Akamu Noble, started their food truck in Topeka in late 2014. They moved to Wichita at the end of 2015.

“We wanted to be around grandma and grandpa,” says Burris, who has a daughter, 1 1/2-year-old Anuhea, with Noble.

Burris, who is from Wichita, worked as a hydrogeologist for a decade before deciding to stay at home with her daughter.

She handles the business side of the truck and will do the same for the restaurant.

“He’s the talent,” Burris says of Noble, who is the chef.

“It’s his culture. It’s his food.”

Burris says Noble is half native Hawaiian and half Japanese.

“We just wanted to make our food more accessible,” Burris says. “It’s something different.”

The restaurant will be able to seat about 30. It’ll be open for lunch and dinner and – likely on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays – for breakfast, too.

“We’d like to try Hawaiian-style breakfast,” Burris says.

Like the truck, the restaurant will serve plate lunches with rice, macaroni salad and a half-pound of meat. That could be kalua pig or Huli-Huli chicken, which is marinated and grilled chicken. Noble House’s ahi tuna poke also is popular.

Burris says the food truck business has been great but that there are only so many hours a day that you can sell from a food truck, and it requires a lot of preparation and cleanup.

“Those are very long days.”

Burris says a lot of people also ask for catering. She says a restaurant is the logical next step for the business.

She plans to keep the truck going, though Burris isn’t sure how often it will go out.

Burris would like to open in December but will be ready by January at the latest. Look for more information, including a video of the new space, closer to the opening.

Carrie Rengers: 316-268-6340, @CarrieRengers

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