Aviation

Boeing posts record year; commercial deliveries up 12 percent

Workers assemble Boeing 787 Dreamliners in the company’s plant in North Charleston, S.C., in December 2013. Boeing said Tuesday that it had delivered 723 commercial planes in 2014.
Workers assemble Boeing 787 Dreamliners in the company’s plant in North Charleston, S.C., in December 2013. Boeing said Tuesday that it had delivered 723 commercial planes in 2014. File photo

Boeing ended 2014 with records in commercial airplane deliveries and net orders.

The company said Tuesday that it delivered 723 jetliners, a nearly 12 percent increase from 648 deliveries in 2013.

Boeing said commercial airplane deliveries in 2014 were its most ever in a single year.

Rival Airbus is set to report its 2014 deliveries next week.

The company also said its sales team booked 1,423 net orders, valued at nearly $233 billion at list prices. Its net orders in 2014 broke a previous all-time high of 1,413 set in 2007.

Boeing said deliveries of the 737 led all of its jetliner deliveries for the year, at 485, followed by deliveries of its newest airplane, the 787, at 114.

Boeing said it delivered 99 777s for the year, six 767s and 19 747s.

Boeing has enjoyed a relatively long run of increased orders for its commercial passenger jets as emerging markets develop their air travel industries and U.S. airlines move to modernize their fleets.

The company said that, in 2015, it expects to begin assembly of its first 737 MAX and establish a firm configuration for its 777X.

Stern Agee analyst Peter Arment said in an interview Tuesday that Boeing had “very strong execution” on airplane deliveries in 2014 and expects “another strong year” in 2015.

He’s forecasting that Boeing will deliver 762 jets in 2015, which would be a 5 percent increase from 2014.

Robert Mann, an airline industry analyst and consultant, said Boeing is benefiting from airlines’ “historic” double-digit profit margins.

And the airlines are using some of those profits to buy newer and more fuel-efficient jetliners.

“I’ve been doing this for almost 40 years, and I’ve never seen anything like it,” Mann said of the industry’s profit margins.

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita builds parts of all Boeing’s jetliners, including the 737 fuselage and the forward, or cockpit, section of the 767, 777 and 787.

Reach Jerry Siebenmark at 316-268-6576 or jsiebenmark@wichitaeagle.com. Follow him on Twitter: @jsiebenmark.

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