ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, SEPT. 8-9 - In this Aug. 17, 2018 photo, Yoshiko Hide, holds family photos on the Toppenish family farm of herself at 7-month-olds at the Yakima Valley Museum in Yakima, Was. Japanese immigrants and Yakama Nation citizens go back decades, to the earliest years that immigrants came to the Valley to help clear the land, dig irrigation canals and work in agriculture. The Yakama Reservation offered a unique opportunity for the immigrants to lease land because as a sovereign nation, it was not subject to the anti-Chinese and anti-Japanese laws implemented by the state.
ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, SEPT. 8-9 - In this Aug. 17, 2018 photo, Yoshiko Hide, holds family photos on the Toppenish family farm of herself at 7-month-olds at the Yakima Valley Museum in Yakima, Was. Japanese immigrants and Yakama Nation citizens go back decades, to the earliest years that immigrants came to the Valley to help clear the land, dig irrigation canals and work in agriculture. The Yakama Reservation offered a unique opportunity for the immigrants to lease land because as a sovereign nation, it was not subject to the anti-Chinese and anti-Japanese laws implemented by the state. Yakima Herald-Republic via AP Amanda Ray
ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, SEPT. 8-9 - In this Aug. 17, 2018 photo, Yoshiko Hide, holds family photos on the Toppenish family farm of herself at 7-month-olds at the Yakima Valley Museum in Yakima, Was. Japanese immigrants and Yakama Nation citizens go back decades, to the earliest years that immigrants came to the Valley to help clear the land, dig irrigation canals and work in agriculture. The Yakama Reservation offered a unique opportunity for the immigrants to lease land because as a sovereign nation, it was not subject to the anti-Chinese and anti-Japanese laws implemented by the state. Yakima Herald-Republic via AP Amanda Ray

Keepsakes reveal clues of life for Japanese in Yakima-area

September 08, 2018 02:05 AM