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U.S. stocks up in early trading Wednesday

A television news report shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as the DAX Index curve shows market reaction following the U.S. presidential election result announcement, inside the Frankfurt Stock Exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, on Nov. 9, 2016.
A television news report shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as the DAX Index curve shows market reaction following the U.S. presidential election result announcement, inside the Frankfurt Stock Exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, on Nov. 9, 2016. Bloomberg

In another surprise in a string of surprising developments in the past 24 hours, the Dow Jones industrial average was up in early trading Wednesday morning.

After hovering in positive territory for a few minutes, however, stocks began to go lower. Starting the trading day at 18,332.74, U.S. stocks rose by about 10 points in the first several minutes of trading after the markets opened at 8:30 a.m., but quickly slipped back to negative territory.

As of 10:10 a.m., the Dow was up close to 60 points. The Nasdaq exchange was down slightly early Wednesday.

Dow futures tumbled overnight as investors worried about the prospects of a Donald Trump presidency in the U.S. American voters chose Trump, a Republican, over Democrat Hillary Clinton in Tuesday’s presidential election.

The prospect of a victory for Trump rattled global financial markets early Wednesday.

Shares had been higher early in Asia’s Wednesday trading session but then turned sharply as investors unloaded shares when Trump first gained the lead in the electoral vote count.

A Trump presidency is seen likely to bring added uncertainty on various issues, including trade policies.

In the past year and a half, American voters have been presented with historic surprises and scandals from their presidential nominees. Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton's promises of "making America great again" and being "stronger together" have

Contributing: New York Times, Bloomberg

Bryan Horwath: 316-269-6708, @bryan_horwath

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