Cal Thomas: Big government is just beginning with Obama

01/27/2013 12:00 AM

01/25/2013 6:26 PM

Bill Clinton isn’t often wrong when it comes to politics, but his assertion in his 1996 State of the Union address that “the era of big government is over” was a bit premature. In light of President Obama’s second inaugural address, the era of big government has just begun.

The president’s address was more campaign rhetoric than visionary. And there were many inconsistencies.

The president quoted the Declaration of Independence, which reads all are “created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life.…” Apparently the president, who supports abortion, doesn’t believe those rights extend to the unborn.

He declared again the false choice between caring for the elderly and needy and making necessary reforms in entitlement programs. But then it’s not his money he’s borrowing and spending. It’s ours, or China’s.

He spoke of America as being “one,” but delivered little more than divisive rhetoric, pushing instead the left’s extreme agenda on “green jobs,” asserting that “global warming” is settled science, which it is not.

In response to Obama’s elevation of same-sex marriage as a civil right, Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, a nonprofit organization working against same-sex marriage legalization, said, “Gay and lesbian people are already treated equally under the law. They have the same civil rights as anyone else; they have the right to live as they wish and love whom they choose. What they don’t have is the right to redefine marriage for all of society. In fact, six federal courts have rejected the idea that there is a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, including the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court in a summary decision in 1972. Furthermore, that vast majority of states have codified the commonsense view held for thousands of years that marriage is the union of a man and a woman.”

The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide.

The president said, “A decade of war is now ending.” You wouldn’t know it by looking at the terrorist attacks in Algeria, Mali or Benghazi. Terrorists don’t think war is ending. Wars don’t end with a unilateral declaration. Someone has to surrender.

There was little about individualism, only the “collective.” Is it the president’s view that government, not the individual, is supreme?

It will be tough for Republicans to counter the president’s apparent march toward collectivism, but it can be done if they stiffen their spines.

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