This image provided by NASA shows the Beagle 2 which was never heard from after its expected Dec. 25, 2003, landing. This and other images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have located the lander close to the center of its planned landing area. Two images taken months apart, with the sun at different angles, are merged in this view. A glint comes from a different part of the lander in one than in the other, interpreted as evidence of more than one deployed panel on the lander. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/University of Leicester)
This image provided by NASA shows the Beagle 2 which was never heard from after its expected Dec. 25, 2003, landing. This and other images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have located the lander close to the center of its planned landing area. Two images taken months apart, with the sun at different angles, are merged in this view. A glint comes from a different part of the lander in one than in the other, interpreted as evidence of more than one deployed panel on the lander. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/University of Leicester) AP
This image provided by NASA shows the Beagle 2 which was never heard from after its expected Dec. 25, 2003, landing. This and other images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have located the lander close to the center of its planned landing area. Two images taken months apart, with the sun at different angles, are merged in this view. A glint comes from a different part of the lander in one than in the other, interpreted as evidence of more than one deployed panel on the lander. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/University of Leicester) AP

Missing for 11 years, Beagle-2 finally located on Mars (VIDEO)

January 16, 2015 11:22 AM

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