State rests case in Kristofer Wright murder trial

04/01/2014 5:47 PM

08/08/2014 10:21 AM

The state rested its case Wednesday morning in the first-degree murder trial of a Wichita man charged in the shooting death of former South High football player Jordan Turner.

Prosecutors said Kristofer JaQuinton Wright, 21, shot Turner to death on March 31, 2013, in a field near Pawnee and 127th Street East because Turner had cheated a woman out of $300 in a marijuana deal.

Turner’s body was found a month later, and a Crime Stoppers tip led to the arrest of four suspects in the case. Three of the four have been charged with murder, while the fourth, Emma Spencer, 19, has testified against the others.

Spencer told the jury on Tuesday that in the hours before the shooting, Turner, 19, and Ebony Nguyen, 21, began arguing after Nguyen accused him of ripping her off in a drug deal. Spencer said that another defendant, Eric Jackson, 22, had a brief physical confrontation with Jordan before the shooting. She said Wright then shot Turner twice, chased him into a field and shot him two more times.

Jackson testified Tuesday that it was Nguyen’s idea to kill Turner.

Among the witnesses testifying Wednesday was deputy medical examiner Timothy Gorrill, who said Turner suffered non-fatal gunshot wounds to the left hand, left foot and left shoulder. He said a bullet that entered Turner’s abdomen and penetrated his heart would have quickly killed him.

“It didn’t just hit it, it made a gaping wound,” he said. “Within 5, maybe 10 seconds, he was at least unconscious,” he told the jury.

Prosecutor Jennifer Amyx said that meant that Wright fired the fatal shot after chasing Turner into the field. She asked Gorrill if a person with a bullet wound to the heart would be able to run far.

“It’s highly unlikely,” he said.

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