Famed aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, pose in front of their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in Los Angeles at the end of May, 1937, prior to  their historic flight in which Earhart was attempting to become first female pilot to circle the globe. A clear plastic shard found on Nikumaroro island in 1977 matches the thickness and curvature of the Lockheed Electra windows.
Famed aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, pose in front of their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in Los Angeles at the end of May, 1937, prior to their historic flight in which Earhart was attempting to become first female pilot to circle the globe. A clear plastic shard found on Nikumaroro island in 1977 matches the thickness and curvature of the Lockheed Electra windows.
Famed aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, pose in front of their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in Los Angeles at the end of May, 1937, prior to their historic flight in which Earhart was attempting to become first female pilot to circle the globe. A clear plastic shard found on Nikumaroro island in 1977 matches the thickness and curvature of the Lockheed Electra windows.

New search hopes to solve Earhart mystery

July 02, 2012 5:00 AM

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