In the fall of 1996, Johnnie Ray McCauley, left, one of the last members of the Kaw Nation to speak the language, and Robert Rankin, a University of Kansas linguistics professor, stand with 28 reel-to-reel tapes of the Kaw language. The tapes were converted to compact discs, allowing new generations of the tribe to learn the Kaw language.
In the fall of 1996, Johnnie Ray McCauley, left, one of the last members of the Kaw Nation to speak the language, and Robert Rankin, a University of Kansas linguistics professor, stand with 28 reel-to-reel tapes of the Kaw language. The tapes were converted to compact discs, allowing new generations of the tribe to learn the Kaw language. File photo
In the fall of 1996, Johnnie Ray McCauley, left, one of the last members of the Kaw Nation to speak the language, and Robert Rankin, a University of Kansas linguistics professor, stand with 28 reel-to-reel tapes of the Kaw language. The tapes were converted to compact discs, allowing new generations of the tribe to learn the Kaw language. File photo

Linguistics professor Robert Rankin worked to document, preserve Kaw language

March 02, 2014 10:52 AM

UPDATED March 02, 2014 11:05 AM

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