Council to consider agreement with center to manage China aviation program

02/09/2014 12:57 PM

02/09/2014 12:58 PM

An economic development partnership that put Wichita at the forefront of the Chinese aviation push heads the agenda of Tuesday’s City Council meeting.

The council is expected to approve a 2014 economic development services agreement for $50,000 with the Kansas World Trade Center. Under the proposed contract, the center will provide management of the Global Air Capital-China program, including oversight of the city’s aviation office in Beijing.

Wichita Mayor Carl Brewer and KWTC president Karyn Page opened the office last year, which will connect Wichita and China businesses for aviation parts, maintenance and other products and services.

The idea to open an office in Beijing came after a visit to China by Brewer, Page and other government and economic development officials in 2012. During the 12-day trip, the delegation met with key government and business officials in six Chinese cities to gauge the market for Wichita-produced aviation goods and expertise.

The Chinese are opening up the nation’s air space in 2015 and are searching for all levels of aviation equipment and skill — from airplanes to pilot training to airport design and construction.

In another action, the council will consider a public hearing on an amendment to the K-96 and Greenwich STAR Bond district boundaries to include public right-of-way at 27th Street North. That property was omitted in the ordinance establishing the district boundaries.

Editor's Choice Videos

Join the Discussion

The Wichita Eagle is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Terms of Service