Lawn calendar

09/13/2013 3:10 PM

08/06/2014 2:49 AM

Warm-season grasses: Bermuda, zoysia, buffalo

March

Spot-treat broadleaf weeds such as dandelions if necessary. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness. If you’re applying a long-term crabgrass preventer, do so around the first of March.

April

If you're applying a short-term crabgrass preventer, do so around the first of April. Water it in.

May to Aug. 15

If you're putting in or refurbishing a warm-season lawn, look for plugs, seed, sprigs or sod in May and June. Warm-season lawns can be planted from mid-May through July.

Fertilize one to four times according to the type of grass and the care you want to give, using 1 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per application. More applications will give a deeper green color but will also increase mowing and lead to a buildup of thatch in Bermuda and zoysia. Here's the breakdown:

•  Bermuda: two to four applications.
•  Zoysia: one to two applications.
•  Buffalo: one to two applications.

If you make one application, do so in June. Two applications: mid-May and July. Three applications: mid-May, June and early August. Four applications: mid-May, June, July and early August.

June

Make a second application of crabgrass preventer by June 15 unless you used a season-lasting crabgrass preventer.

If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing Merit (imidacloprid) or Mach 2 (halofenozide). Either product should be applied by the first of July. Merit can be applied as early as mid-May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. Both products work as a grub preventer. They must be watered in.

June is a good time to core-aerate. It alleviates compaction, increases the rate of water infiltration, improves soil-air exchange and helps control thatch.

Late July through August

If you haven't applied a grub preventer and see grub damage, apply a grub killer. Water in immediately.

Late October

Spray for broadleaf weeds such as dandelions, henbit and chickweed if they are a problem. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness.

Cool-season grasses: fescue, Kentucky bluegrass

March

Spot-treat broadleaf weeds such as dandelions if necessary. Treat on a day that is 50 degrees or warmer. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours of application will reduce effectiveness. If you’re applying a long-term crabgrass preventer, do so around the first of March.

April

If you're applying a shorter-lasting crabgrass preventer, do so around the first of April. Water it in.

If overseeding, do so before mid-April and use a crabgrass preventer containing siduron.

May

Fertilize with slow-release fertilizer in mid-May if you'll be watering the lawn during summer. If you let it go dormant in dry spells, skip the May fertilization. If the lawn has broadleaf weeds such as dandelions, you can use a combination product that will kill the weeds as well as fertilize. Wait 24 hours before watering it in.

June

Make a second application of crabgrass preventer by June 15 unless you used a season-lasting crabgrass preventer.

If grubs have been a problem in the past, apply a product containing Merit (imidacloprid) or Mach 2 (halofenozide). Either product should be applied by the first of July. Merit can be applied as early as mid-May if there are problems with billbugs or May beetle grubs. Both products work as a grub preventer. They must be watered in.

Late July through August

If you haven't applied a grub preventer and see grub damage, apply a grub killer. Water in immediately.

September

The best weed control is a thick lawn, and September is the time to thicken cool-season lawns by overseeding and fertilizing. This fertilizer — the most important of the year — does not have to be slow-release.

Overseed by mid-October. Fertilize newly seeded lawns at seeding time and a month later.

Core aeration in the fall will help alleviate compaction, increase the rate of water infiltration, increase the depth of phosphorus and potassium penetration and improve soil-air exchange. If you're overseeding, aerate first.

If a soil test calls for phosphorus or potassium, apply the appropriate fertilizer after core-aerating.

Late October

Spray for broadleaf weeds such as dandelions, henbit and chickweed if they are a problem. Treat on a day that is at least 50 degrees. Rain or irrigation within 24 hours reduces effectiveness.

November

Do your fall fertilization after Oct. 15. You can use Barricade for your November fertilizer; it also will control some grassy weeds. The weed preventer can last through the spring.

Source: Adapted from K-State Research and Extension

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