Dr. Andrew Clark of Cambridge University, right, performs a skin prick test, which is used to diagnose food allergies, on Lena Barden, 12, during clinical trials at Addenbrooke's Hospital Clinical Research Facility, Cambridge, England.
Dr. Andrew Clark of Cambridge University, right, performs a skin prick test, which is used to diagnose food allergies, on Lena Barden, 12, during clinical trials at Addenbrooke's Hospital Clinical Research Facility, Cambridge, England. AP
Dr. Andrew Clark of Cambridge University, right, performs a skin prick test, which is used to diagnose food allergies, on Lena Barden, 12, during clinical trials at Addenbrooke's Hospital Clinical Research Facility, Cambridge, England. AP

Health & Fitness

February 03, 2014 12:00 AM

New treatment could reduce kids’ peanut allergies

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