The average number of sick days for U.S. workers in 2007 was 14

12/21/2010 12:00 AM

08/08/2014 10:01 AM

U.S. workers took an average of 14 sick days in 2007.

On average, employees took 10 days off because they were sick or injured and four to care for family members, according to the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

The agency's analysis also found that:

* Workers ages 55 to 64 took an average of 18 days off work, compared with 10 days for workers ages 16 to 24.

* About 38 percent of female workers missed work in 2007 for their own health problems, versus about 30 percent of male employees.

* 24 percent of married women and 17 percent of married men aged 16-64 were more likely to miss work to care for a sick child or other family member, compared with 14 percent of unmarried women and 7 percent of unmarried men.

* Only 26 percent of uninsured employees took sick leave as compared to 36.5 percent of privately insured workers, and 32 percent of people with Medicaid or other public insurance.

—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Website will track recalls

Trying to track recalled products and foods that might be harmful to children is a nightmare for parents because there has been no single place to look.

Until now.

ClickCheckandProtect.org, a new Consumer Reports companion website, is the product of a newly formed National School Safety Coalition convened by Consumer Reports, the National Parent Teacher Association and the National School Boards Association.

"The whole idea is to get the information into the homes of school-aged children," said Don Mays, senior director of safety for Consumer Reports.

The hope is not only to encourage parents to check the site but also to have its new information distributed by weekly school newsletters sent to children's homes — anything to make it easier for parents to learn about recalls, he said.

The coalition will distribute safety alerts and recall notices on such children's products as toys, food, medicines and furniture.

In March, the CPSC will launch SafeProducts.gov, which will host a dangerous-products database.

—Chicago Tribune

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