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Temp jobs on rise in today’s shifting economy

  • Associated Press
  • Published Sunday, May 25, 2014, at 12 a.m.

— Although the U.S. economy has improved since the recession ended five years ago, part-time and “contract” workers are filling many of the new jobs.

Contract workers made up less than half of 1 percent of all U.S. employment in the 1980s but now account for 2.3 percent. Economists predict contract workers will play a larger role in the years ahead.

They are a diverse army of laborers, ranging from janitors, security officers, home-care and food service workers to computer programmers, freelance photographers and illustrators. Many are involved in manufacturing. Many others are self-employed, working under contracts that lay out specific responsibilities and deadlines.

Labor leaders and many economists worry. Contract workers have less job security and don’t contribute to the economy through spending as much as permanent, full-time workers. Nor do they have the same job protections or benefits. Few are union members.

“It is not hugely clear that we’re coming into a temp-worker, contract-worker, contingent-worker nation. But it’s something to keep an eye on,” said Heidi Shierholz, an economist with the labor-oriented Economic Policy Institute. “There’s definitely been an increase in the share of those working part time.”

Part-time and contract jobs in the past tended to rise during recessions and recede during recoveries. But maybe no longer: Part-time workers have accounted for more than 10 percent of U.S. job growth in the years since the recession officially ended in June 2009. Meanwhile, union membership has been sliding since the mid-1980s.

Businesses often hire contract workers or freelancers because it is less expensive than hiring full-time workers.

“Workers increasingly serve businesses that do not officially ‘employ’ the worker – a distinction that hampers organizing, erodes labor standards and dilutes accountability,” said Catherine Ruckelshaus, general counsel for the National Employment Law Project, which advocates on behalf of low-wage workers.

Many business leaders have a different take.

“Some people don’t want to be a full-time employee. They want contract work,” said Bruce Josten, executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Still, Josten recognizes that some of them “are hoping the contract work will ultimately lead them into a full-time position.”

A recent Federal Reserve study showed that nearly 7.5 million people who are working part time – contract workers included – would rather have full-time jobs.

Analysts suggest the increase in contract and “temp” jobs will likely accelerate as more baby boomers retire from their full-time jobs.

Pressure from a company’s shareholders – often focused on short-term returns – can also lead businesses to lower labor costs by reclassifying a portion of their payroll as part-timers or spinning them off to a contracting agency.

The online job site CareerBuilder.com, which specializes in “contract placement,” cites research showing that 42 percent of employers intend to hire temporary or contract workers as part of their 2014 staffing strategy – a 14 percent increase over the past five years.

A recent Brookings Institution study labeled the first decade of the 21st century a “Lost Decade” for the labor market. For the first time since World War II, the U.S. economy did not have more payroll jobs at the end of a decade than at the beginning. And the shadow of the December 2007-June 2009 recession still looms over today’s labor market.

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