Log Out | Member Center

49°F

50°/38°

Shellac requires special technique to remove from nails

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
  • Published Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, at 10:49 a.m.

Shellac may brush on like traditional nail polish, but the no-chip manicure formula requires a special technique for removal. To save money at the salon and remove the polish at home, follow these simple steps. You’ll need:

• Cotton balls or cotton pads (we think pads work best)

• Enough aluminum foil to cover 10 finger tips

• 100 percent acetone (available at most beauty supply stores)

• Cuticle stick

• Buffer

Tear aluminum foil into 10, 4-inch squares – one for each finger. Set aside. Soak a cotton pad in acetone until it is fully drenched. Wrap the cotton pad around one finger and secure it with an aluminum foil square. Do the same for the hand’s remaining four fingers. The removal process works more efficiently if you work one hand at a time. Wait 10-15 minutes and slide your nails out of the foil. Your shellac should look like flaking polish at this point. The more flakes the better. Use a cuticle stick to scrape the flaking polish off. If the shellac does not remove easily, simply slide the finger back in the acetone-soaked cotton and aluminum covering for a couple more minutes. Repeat the same steps on the other hand. Once all the shellac is removed, use a buffer to restore nails to their original look.

Additional tip: Avoid dipping hands or finger beds directly in a cup of acetone to prevent your skin from drying out. The aluminum foil method helps limit your skins contact with the chemical.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The Wichita Eagle welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views. Please see our commenting policy for more information.

Have a news tip? You can send it to wenews@wichitaeagle.com or consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Wichita Eagle.

Search for a job

in

Top jobs