Log Out | Member Center

66°F

89°/71°

Cal Thomas: Government isn’t best way to create change

  • Tribune Content Agency
  • Published Sunday, July 28, 2013, at 12 a.m.

Now for some good news, and it has nothing to do with the birth of the royal baby.

According to a USA Today/Bipartisan Policy Center poll, Americans say by a more than 2-1 majority that the “best way to make positive changes in society is through volunteer organizations and charities, not by being active in government.” Even better: People younger than 30 are especially put off by politics and “significantly less likely than their parents to say participating in politics is an important value in their lives.”

Why is this good news? There are at least two reasons. One is that the less faith people have in government, the more they are likely to have in themselves. The second is that a public loss of faith in politics and politi-cians increases the possibility of government becoming smaller. That could mean less spending, a smaller deficit and ultimately, one hopes, lower taxes.

On the same day the USA Today poll was published, a McClatchy-Marist poll found President Obama “is suffering his lowest approval numbers in nearly two years.” His June approval rating was 41 percent, down from 50 percent in April.

Obama’s endless speeches aren’t cutting it. The public wants the action it was promised. It’s not getting any and so is increasingly disillusioned with politics and politicians.

Republicans don’t escape blame. The McClatchy-Marist poll found only 22 percent of those surveyed approve of congressional Republicans.

Again, this is – or can be – good news for the country and even for Republicans if they get the message.

USA Today quoted Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill.: “There’s a skepticism of government. Young people say, ‘If I want to feed the hungry or make a difference for cancer patients, it’s easier to do that through a nonprofit and see the tangible results up close than, say, trying to push for federal funding to do the same.’” At 32, Schock is the second-youngest member of Congress and may reflect the attitude of many of his generation.

What’s the message? It is that the states are mostly doing a far better job in addressing people’s needs and wants than Washington, and charitable organizations are addressing problems the federal government only talks about.

If Republicans want to regain trust, they should be focusing less on the failures of Democrats and more on the successes of Republican governors, Republican legislatures, charitable organizations and volunteers. They are achieving goals Washington can’t. Instead, Washington continues to misspend too much money with little to show for it.

The USA Today poll found that young people put “elected official or working for one” at the very bottom of their career choices. Given the performance of Washington’s political class, who can blame them?

Cal Thomas is a columnist with Tribune Content Agency.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The Wichita Eagle welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views. Please see our commenting policy for more information.

Have a news tip? You can send it to wenews@wichitaeagle.com.

Search for a job

in

Top jobs