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Kansas State researchers part of team to map domestic pig genome

  • Published Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, at 8:28 a.m.

An international scientific collaboration that includes two Kansas State University researchers has successfully mapped the genome of the domestic pig, the university said in a news release.

The sequenced genome gives researchers a complete list of DNA and genes that give pigs their traits like height and color. Once all of the genetic information is understood, scientists anticipate improvements to the animal’s health as well as human health, because pigs and humans share similar physiologies.

"With the sequenced genome we have a better blueprint than we had before about the pig’s genetics and how those genetic mechanisms work together to create, such as the unique merits in disease resistance," said Yongming Sang, research assistant professor of anatomy and physiology at Kansas State University.

For three years, Sang worked on the genome sequencing project with Frank Blecha, associate dean for the College of Veterinary Medicine and university distinguished professor of anatomy and physiology.

A report of the international study appears as the cover story for the Nov. 15 issue of the journal Nature.

Roy Wenzl

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