Log Out | Member Center

87°F

86°/64°

COMPLETE LIVE ELECTION RESULTS Vote totals trickle in slowly in Sedgwick County

  • Eagle staff
  • Published Monday, August 6, 2012, at 11:19 p.m.
  • Updated Monday, July 28, 2014, at 7:16 a.m.

KS Senate 25, Republican | Details

O'Donnell
59
Schodorf
40

KS Senate 25, Democratic | Details

Schuckman
47
Snow
52

KS Senate 26, Republican | Details

Kelsey
42
Kerschen
57

KS Senate 31, Republican | Details

Mason
45
McGinn
55

KS House 86, Democratic | Details

Loganbill
43
Ward
56

SG District Attorney, Republican | Details

Bennett
54
O'Connor
45

SG Sheriff, Republican | Details

Easter
73
Hinshaw
26

SG County Commission 3, Republican | Details

Longwell
43
Peterjohn
56

US House 4, Democratic | Details

Freeman
29
Tillman
71

KS BOE 8, Republican | Details

Busch
61
Chappell
39

Green indicates a winner declared with all precincts reporting. Sedgwick County, statewide votes final.

More information

Have questions about voting?

Not sure if you are a registered voter? Not sure where to vote? To confirm your registration or find your polling place, check the voter card that was mailed to you in mid-July or go to https://myvoteinfo.voteks.org.

Or you can call your county election office:

Sedgwick: 316-660-7100 or 877-530-7194

Butler: 316-322-4229 or 800-822-7119

Harvey: 316-284-6840

Sumner: 620-326-3395

Problems at the polls?

If you encounter problems voting, let us know. E-mail us at tips@wichitaeagle.com or call 316-269-6762 and leave a message.

More information

This story was reported through the Public Insight Network, a group of more than 700 Kansans who have volunteered to share their insights, ideas and experiences with journalists. We’d like you to join too. It’s free. We won’t spam you, share your information with marketers or use the information you give us without your permission. You will receive an e-mail about once a month asking if you would like to offer your insights on a local issue. Sign up at www.kansas.com/publicinsight.

Voter toolbox

Who can vote?

Republicans can vote in the Republican primary. Democrats can vote in the Democratic primary.

Registered voters who are unaffiliated can vote in either primary, but not both. Unaffiliated voters who wish to vote in the Republican primary will have to fill out a new voter registration card at the polls and join the party before they will be allowed to vote.

When can you vote?

Polls in Sedgwick and Butler counties will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Polls in Harvey and Sumner counties will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

For more information

Not sure if you are a registered voter? Not sure where to vote? To confirm your registration or find your polling place, check the voter card that was mailed to you in mid-July or go to https://myvoteinfo.voteks.org.

Or you can call your county election office:

• Sedgwick: 316-660-7100 or 877-530-7194

•  Butler: 316-322-4229 or 800-822-7119

•  Harvey: 316-284-6840

•  Sumner: 620-326-3395

Navigating the voter ID law

Most voters casting a ballot in person or by mail must now provide one of eight valid government-issued photo IDs under the state’s new voter ID law, which took effect Jan. 1. Election officials say the best tip they can offer is to be prepared at the polls.

Take a current driver’s license, a state identification card, a United States passport, a public assistance card, a concealed-carry permit, military ID, government employee ID or university student ID

Voters age 65 and older may use expired photo IDs.

If you forget your ID, cast a provisional ballot and provide valid ID to the Sedgwick County Election Office within a few days

Tell us

If you encounter problems voting, let us know. E-mail us at tips@wichitaeagle.com or call 316-269-6762 and leave a message.

At Kansas.com on Election Night

For information

You’ll find constant updates on election results, plus news reports and photos on key local races. Follow along with reporters on the scene by using the Twitter hashtag #ksvote.

For fun

Reporters Denise Neil, Suzanne Perez Tobias and Carrie Rengers will once again bravely crash election watch parties to bring you behind-the-bunting scoop on who’s living it up — and how — and who may be crying in the corner as results roll in. Follow their updates on the Kansas.com home page and on Twitter at #ksvoteparty.

Election results for Sedgwick County primary races came in slowly Tuesday night.

The slowness of the returns followed an error by the county election office earlier in the evening that caused the initial returns, from advance ballots, to show up as much more complete results on the county’s website.

The resulting confusion — with candidates thinking early on that they’d either won or lost — led at least one candidate to call for an investigation of the county election commissioner.

“There’s got to be an investigation of this terrible reporting,” a weary Jean Schodorf said at about 10:15 p.m. at the Wichita Boathouse, after most of her supporters had left her watch party and she prepared to go home to go to bed. The numbers that had come in to that point made her think she had probably lost her state Senate race to Michael O’Donnell, but she wasn’t able to definitively concede. “I’ve never seen it so slow. I’ve never seen anything so poorly handled. It’s just atrocious.”

The problem began when election officials checked a box in an electronic form that they shouldn’t have, causing the computer system to report on the election website that all ballots had been counted, said Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman.

Actually, only the absentee results were included in that early tally, she said.

While the glitch didn’t affect the actual vote count, it did prompt the vote counters to slow down and double- and triple-check their work to ensure they didn’t make any more serious mistakes, Lehman said.

She said the problem stemmed from a lack of experience among new staffers at the office. The election office has seen substantial turnover and some staff cuts since Lehman took over, she said.

Even after the final reports were reported just before midnight, Lehman said she was recalling a computer expert to the office to fix misreported precinct numbers.

Lehman said she also had to have her password reset to report the results to the Secretary of State’s Office in Topeka.

Lehman said the staff will try to apply lessons learned when they conduct the general election three months from now.

Asked what she will change, she replied “more staff.”

About 20 percent of registered voters turned out for the primary election in Sedgwick County. Lehman had predicted 15 percent turnout in the county and Secretary of State Kris Kobach had predicted 18 percent statewide.

During the day, there had been glitches as polling places in Sedgwick County went electronic with a new voter ID law.

“Some of this is new equipment, and we’re working out the kinks,” Lehman said of the problems. “It hasn’t been bad. It’s been off and on throughout the day. This gives us a chance to iron those out before (the) presidential (election). When we come into the high turnout numbers, we’re ready and prepared for that.”

For the first time in a statewide election, voters had to show a government-issued photo ID – a current driver’s license, a state identification card, a U.S. passport, a public-assistance card, a concealed-carry permit, a military ID, a government employee ID or a university student ID.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach said the new law requiring voters to show a photo ID had gone smoothly, although he acknowledged that some still disagreed with the law.

At Westlink Church of Christ, Pam Mitchell, 61, said, "I love that they’re checking IDs."

Wichitan Martha Ealy, who voted at Christ the King church on West Maple, said she thought the new electronic books were an improvement.

“I thought it was faster because everything came off my ID. They used to have to go through books” looking for voters’ names, Ealy said.

But after voting at the Senior Center in Park City, Vivian Goodman, 67, said the voter ID law was a “deliberate move” on Kobach’s part to “deny many voters the ability to vote.”

The new ID scanning machines delayed voting at Bel Aire City Hall. Election officials there said both machines refused a number of times to scan people’s driver’s licenses.

Lehman said she had also gotten complaints after the elections office sent out 140 mail ballots on July 19, but they apparently never arrived at voters’ homes. The elections office issued replacement ballots to those who called. Others were supposed to be able to vote in person.

“Our concern is that these people get to vote,” she said.

At least one voter who showed up to vote at his polling place Tuesday was told that he was registered in the system as having already voted. Election workers allowed him to cast a provisional ballot.

Lehman said that because the voter had been recorded as having been sent an advance ballot, the voting machine showed him as already having voted. His provisional ballot will be counted, she said, as will those of other voters in the same situation.

She said she was also somewhat concerned about having 140 ballots floating around, but that no one had tried to use them to vote illegally.

Contributing: Dion Lefler, Annie Calovich, Dan Voorhis, Stan Finger, Rick Plumlee, Brent Wistrom, Roy Wenzl and Amy Renee Leiker of The Eagle

Subscribe to our newsletters

The Wichita Eagle welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views. Please see our commenting policy for more information.

Have a news tip? You can send it to wenews@wichitaeagle.com.

Search for a job

in

Top jobs